Celebrations And Holidays, Christmas, Gardening, Gardens, Tyler, Wildlife

Thinking about throwing away your real Christmas tree once Christmas has come and passed? Think again! There are so much you can do with your Christmas tree that can benefit the environment and also your own home. So when it is time to box up the decorations, consider our suggestions on what to do with your real Christmas tree after Christmas.

christmas-tree

Tree Pine Needle Sachet

One thing for sure, the scent that the tree gives is great and gives a fresh feeling in any room. This is why it would be a great idea to make a sachet of the tree’s pine needles and place them around your home so the freshness doesn’t leave in a hurry! Nothing is better than having a natural fragrance surround you.

Bee Hotel

Now I know what you’re thinking… it sounds odd but in fact it’s possible and very beneficial to the friendly Solitary bees that fly by. When creating the bee hotel, use the trunk as it’s the thickest part of the tree and then follow by drilling reasonable sized holes big enough for bees to fly in and out of. Once that is done, find the perfect spot to place your new bee hotel and make sure it is in direct sunlight.

Home for the Wildlife

If you don’t fancy bees booking reservations at the bee hotel, then we’d suggest making your old Christmas tree into a safe home for wildlife. All you’ve gotta do is place the tree in a corner in the garden that you’re willing wildlife such as Birds, rabbits, hedgehogs and squirrels to use. This ensures that they have a safe, dry spot to hide during the Winter season.

Bird Feeders

Another great solution to what you could do with the tree is to make it into a Bird Feeder holder. Find a spot where it’ll be easy for birds to find the tree and perch on the branches and then hang your filled Bird Feeders on the branches. Wild birds will feel comfortable while feeding from the feeders due to the natural tree setting.

Be sure to send us photos of what you did with your Christmas Tree through our Facebook and Twitter; we’d love to see what you did different!

Tyler at PrimroseTyler works in the Primrose Marketing team, mainly working on Social Media and Online Marketing.

Tyler is a big fan on everything sports and supports Arsenal Football Club. When not writing Primrose blogs and tweets, you can find Tyler playing for his local Sunday football team or in the gym.

See all of Tyler’s posts.

Decoration, Garden Design, Jenny

History of garden gnomes

There’s no Place like Gnome

Once upon a time in the surprisingly not fictional village of Gräfenroda in the genuinely not made up free state of Thuringia, there lived a man named Phillip Griebel. To narrow that down a bit, we’re talking about the mid-nineteenth century in central Germany. Philip was a sculptor by trade who specialised in the crafting of terracotta animals. At some point Philip decided to branch out and sculpt mythical creatures. European folklore is abundant with fabulous little homunculi and beasties but Philip was charmed most by the kaukis. Depending on where you’re from you might know them as ‘leprechauns’ and ‘clurichauns’ in Ireland, ‘saunatonttu’ in Finland, ‘nisse’ or ‘tomte’ in Scandinavia, ‘barbegazi’ in Switzerland and France, and ‘voettir’ in Iceland. Today we know them best as gnomes.

Philip wasn’t alone in his love of gnomes as of all his mythical beast sculptures it was the gnome that endured as favourite. While this is all charming we do have to point out that the company Baehr and Maresch based in Dresden would claim earlier creation of garden gnomes as they had stock of “little folk” statues as early as 1841. If you want to get really picky about it you can credit the origins of garden gnomes to the Romans who placed stone representations of the Greco-Roman fertility god Priapus in their gardens to help plants grow. Wherever they came from they are here to stay.

The popularity of garden gnomes declined during the first World War and most of the second World War as, understandably, people had far more on their minds than garden ornamentation and folklore. It wasn’t until the 1930s that popularity of these little garden guardians soared after the release of Disney’s ground breaking feature length animation Snow White and The Seven Dwarves. In the 1970s, presumably aided by the popularity of experimentation with certain substances, gnomes became even more fantastical, whimsical and downright weird. There was one more big surge in the popularity of garden gnomes in the 1990s with the popularity of “roaming gnome”, a practical joke where gnomes were stolen from gardens and the owners were posted photos of the gnome in humorous situations and/or exotic locations.

Dwarf gnome

Jenny at PrimroseJenny works in the Primrose Product Loading team working on adding new and exciting products to the website. When she’s not writing, proofreading or drinking the strongest coffee possible Jenny loves to climb and can often be found halfway up a wall at the local climbing centre.

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Christmas, Gardening, Gardens, Grow Your Own, Megan, Wildlife

tree branches in snow

Christmas is officially almost here. Although it is an enjoyable time of year for most, for some it can be a struggle. It is a challenging time for our stress levels with changes of routine and lots of pressure. This can be made even worse by an existing mental health problem. 1 in 4 people in the UK experience some kind of mental health problem in their lives. That’s a massive 16.41 million people. Venture into garden therapy and you’ll hopefully see lots of benefits.

Spending time outdoors can relieve stress and improve your mental health. If you’re feeling down, anxious, or struggling with something else, getting out into your garden might help. I myself suffer from depression.  From experience, spending time in nature improves my mental outlook, helps me relax and boosts my mood, even on the downest of days. We’ve compiled a list of things you can do in your garden at this time of year. Try one or more of them out if you want to see what garden therapy can do for you.

Meditate

garden therapy zen stones

Yes it may be chilly, but wrap up warm and find a nice quiet corner of your garden to sit down and meditate. Mindfulness is now a recommended treatment for people who struggle with their mental health. It it also used by people who want to improve their overall mental wellbeing. To get started with meditation, download an app such as Stop, Breathe & Think or HeadSpace. Both have simple, easy to follow meditations for beginners.

Feed The Birds

garden bird on feeding dish

Research has shown that watching garden birds is good for your mental health. Invest in some wild bird care and enjoy the wonders of the many species of bird it’ll attract to your garden. The most common garden birds in the UK are house sparrows, starlings, blackbirds and blue tits so keep an eye out for those. A good place to start is by buying a ready-to-use bird feeder and hanging it on a tree branch in your garden. Alternatively, there are a wide range of bird seed mixes, from general mixes to mixes that will attract certain species such as robins.

Grow Something

hands planting a cactus

Although this may seem daunting to someone who has never gardened before, growing something from seed doesn’t have to be stress central. In fact, you’ll be sure to feel a sense of achievement, nurturing something that started in your hand as a packet of seeds and is now something you can serve on your plate, or admire the beauty of. Invest in a grow kit and see where the world of growing plants will take you. You never know – this time next year you might be harvesting your own veg patch!

Mental wellbeing is boosted by being outdoors so don’t neglect your garden because it’s cold! Using garden therapy can reap great benefits. So get outside, get relaxed, and get happy.

Megan at PrimroseMegan works in the Primrose marketing team. When she is not at her desk you will find her half way up a hill in the Chilterns
or enjoying the latest thriller series on Netflix. Megan also enjoys cooking vegetarian feasts with veggies from her auntie’s vegetable garden.

See all of Megan’s posts.

Celebrations And Holidays, Christmas, Decoration, Gardening, Gardens, How To, Lighting, Tyler

As Christmas is edging closer and closer by the day, it’s that time to start decorating your home with colourful, festive decorations and lights! Remember our 20 DIY Outdoor Christmas Decorations blog? Well here at Primrose, we have decided to go further and try it out for ourselves and this is how we did it…

Terracotta Snowman

First off to get your living room looking more Christmassy, make your own Terracotta Snowman! To make this snowman without the hassle of waiting for it to snow, all you need is 3 painted terracotta pots. Start by placing the 3 cups on top of each other, add a hat and scarf and then glue together. Paint on the face and you’re done! Sit your new homemade terracotta snowman outside to add the festive feeling to your garden.

Pine Cone Christmas Tree

The Pine Cone Tree is a great alternative to your traditional christmas tree. All that is needed to create one is a terracotta pot and a suitable sized pine cone. We recommend that you talk a nice walk with family and friends and find a pine cone along your travels! Now paint it with Christmas colours and make a star to place on top of it. The pine cone tree will be perfect on your outdoor table or around the house.

Lighted Hanging Basket

Hanging Basket aren’t quite the same if there isn’t any lights added onto it… This is why our hanging basket stands out more. You can make your own hanging basket a Christmas alternative decoration this year by filling it with spare ornaments and nature. You should then proceed to wrap coloured or white lights around the basket. Hang it outside your front door to embrace the Christmas spirit.

Glass Bottle Lantern

Similar to our glass jar lantern, the glass bottle lantern is another beautiful ornament to have as christmas decorations on your desk or on the dinner table at home. As you may have guessed already, the supplies you’ll need for this particular Christmas decoration is an empty glass bottle and lights, pretty simple right? Wire in the lights into the bottle and then you’re set to have a magical looking lantern wherever you please!

Clothes Peg Star

clothes peg star

If you’re left stuck without a star to add on your Christmas tree this year, no fear! You can create your very own star by using your spare clothes pegs. On ours, we decided to paint it red to go with the rest of our decorations around the office so we advise you paint it to your preference.

 

 

Be sure to send us over the decorations you’ve created this year on our Facebook and Twitter; we’d love to see them!

homemade christmas decorations

Tyler at PrimroseTyler works in the Primrose Marketing team, mainly working on Social Media and Online Marketing.

Tyler is a big fan on everything sports and supports Arsenal Football Club. When not writing Primrose blogs and tweets, you can find Tyler playing for his local Sunday football team or in the gym.

See all of Tyler’s posts.