Amie, Children in the garden, Garden Tips, Gardening, Grow Your Own, How To, Primrose.co.uk

Growing up, my first exposure to gardening was planting sunflower seeds in my grandparent’s back garden and watching them grow taller than me! I used to love getting my hands dirty and playing in the muck of the garden, but it seems a lot of children today would prefer to do the opposite.

Follow these steps to get the kids back into the garden and appreciating the outdoor elements.

1) Plant exciting flowers or varieties
Flowers which don’t require a lot of work or maintenance, such as sunflowers or marigolds are a great starting point for children. Sunflowers grow really tall, which I remember fascinated me. Sensory plants such as Stachys Byzantina (Lamb’s Ears) or Mentha Spicata (Spearmint) will also excite young ones. You can’t go too wrong with seed based plants due to their ease.

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2) Use grown vegetables for dinner
Do you have fussy eater in your household? If so, get them involved with the growing of fresh fruit and vegetables. Carrots, potatoes, tomatoes, the possibilities are endless. It will be rewarding when you sit down for tea and eat all of your hard work too.

Harvesting Summer Vegetables

3) Decorate plant pots
You can easily get some plain pots, which are cheap enough to paint and decorate. This combines creativity with gardening, and then allows for potting and planting afterwards.

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4) Build a wormery
Most children are fascinated by worms, and why wouldn’t they be? Worms are wonderful little creatures so support their habitation by building a wormery. Simply fill a glass jar or box with moist soil, sand, vegetable peelings, vegetation and leaves, and some worms. You can then look at how they behave, how they move and how they look.

wormery

5) Create a treasure hunt
Children love a treasure hunt, so hide some goodies (perhaps chocolate if you’re feeling generous) in your garden, ensuring they’re hidden well! Bury underneath bushes or hide up trees, and promote the idea of getting mucky and stuck in. It doesn’t matter if your garden is small (or you have no garden), you can go to the park or some wooded area and do this too.

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Show us how they get on, and send in any pictures or stories, especially of worms! If your photo contains a Primrose product and we feature it on site, you will also get a £5 voucher!

  • Email photos@primrose.co.uk
  • Tweet us @PrimroseUK
  • Facebook us @ facebook.com/Primrose.co.uk

We recently had photos sent in from one customer who is helping to educate future gardeners using one of our New Leaf polytunnels!

  

AmieAmie is a marketing enthusiast, having worked at Primrose since graduating from Reading University in 2014.

She enjoys all things sport. A keen football fan, Amie follows Tottenham Hotspur FC, and regularly plays for her local 5 a side football team.

Amie also writes restaurant reviews on  Barnard’s Burger Blog.

Garden Tips, George, How To

Collecting rainwater in your garden

Given how unreliable our climate can be, collecting rainwater to use in your garden is a beneficial activity all year round. Especially in the summer months, from around July onwards, there is usually not enough water in the soil to satisfy growing plants. But the demand on the mains supply to water them stretches the available resources and can damage the environment. So it pays to harvest your own rainfall, and it can be easier than you think to collect it.

What are the benefits of using rainwater in the garden?

  • Beat the hosepipe ban with your own sustainable water supply.
  • The water you collect is free and can reduce your monthly bills.
  • Rainwater has a balanced pH level, which is best for plants, and free from any chemicals.
  • Reduce the demand on the water table to protect environmental resources.

Water butt

How to collect rainwater in your garden

The easiest way to save the rainwater that falls on your property is by collecting that which runs off your roof. All you need is guttering, drainage pipes and a water butt.

Experts estimate that around 24,000 litres of water falls on the average rooftop per year. The great thing is this can be saved, no matter what size garden you have. Even a small patio has room for a water butt.

But don’t stop with your house. Any outbuilding with a roof is a prime rain collector. Sheds, garages and greenhouses can be fitted with gutters and their own water tanks.

For the best results, it’s essential to keep your gutters and water butts clean. This will prevent the build up of any bacteria or diseases harmful to your plants. If you want to stock up on the maximum rainfall then fit multiple water butts together, so you don’t miss a drop!

Bubble wall

This month I was interviewed by Garden Life about how to enhance your garden. We discussed the benefits of creating shade, privacy and fun outdoors through various lifestyle products. Check it out!

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

Amie, Clocks, General Advice, New Products, News, Primrose.co.uk

Garden clocks are often a focal point of someone’s garden. They not only look appealing, but serve a beneficial function. You know the one, where you are relaxing in the garden, drinks are flowing and the sun in shining, but you just lose track of time? Primrose and their new clock brand About Time™ have just launched four brand new clocks, which will look perfect in any garden.

Metal Garden Clock in a Antique Patina Finish

Wheel Metal Garden Clock in a Black Painted Finish

Decorative Garden Sun Clock in a Copper Finish

Mechanical Metal Garden Clock in a Rust Finish

Which one is your favourite?

We’d love to see and show off your photos of the above clocks too, and if we feature them on site, you will get a £5 voucher!

  • Email photos@primrose.co.uk
  • Tweet us @PrimroseUK
  • Facebook us @ facebook.com/Primrose.co.uk

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AmieAmie is a marketing enthusiast, having worked at Primrose since graduating from Reading University in 2014.

She enjoys all things sport. A keen football fan, Amie follows Tottenham Hotspur FC, and regularly plays for her local 5 a side football team.

Amie also writes restaurant reviews on  Barnard’s Burger Blog.

Charlie, Garden Tips, Garden Tools, Gardening, Gardening Year, Grow Your Own, How To, Quick Tips

One of Primrose's many fruit storage solutions.
One of Primrose’s many fruit storage solutions.

Following on from David’s post about the harvest, I thought I’d share with you Primrose’s top tips for keeping your fruit fresh all winter.

  1. Throw away bruisers. Despite the old saying, the truth is one bad apple really can spoil the bunch. Segregate any apples with bruises or rot on them. Storing them with healthy apples can lead to the good apples rotting as well.
  2. Space the apples out. Another way to prevent rot spreading is to space your apples out so they are not touching. It also helps to keep different varieties of apples on different shelves, as they tend to decay at different rates and you don’t want your faster spoiling golden delicious apples spoiling your long lasting cox apples, for instance.
  3. Wrap your apples. Following on from this, one piece of advice is to wrap your apples in newspaper – this will prevent contact and stop any rot from spreading between apples. Be sure to use plain black and white newspaper or paper as coloured ink contains poisonous elements that you don’t want in prolonged contact with your apples.
  4. Don’t let your apples freeze. Frozen apples are spoiled apples. This is why it’s best to store apples in a cool cellar, but don’t worry, you can always bring your apples into your conservatory or kitchen for a few nights if you know it’s going to be below freezing for extended periods.
  5. Don’t forget – here at Primrose we have a great range of fruit storage solutions. Check out our range of fruit racks here. They’re perfect for keeping out rodents and other pests and keeping your fruit off the ground and fresh through the autumn.

And that’s our top five tips for keeping apples fresh. But what to do with those rotten apples I mentioned? Well they’re perfect for making cider…

 

CharlieCharlie works in the Primrose marketing team, mainly in online marketing.

When not writing for the Primrose Blog, Charlie likes nothing more than a good book and a cool cider.

To see the rest of Charlie’s posts, click here.