Animals, George, How To

How to Make A Dog-Friendly Garden

Giving your pets the space to run around is one of the most important aspects of owning an animal. And if you have your own garden to do so then it’s worth making the most of it. Create a safe, secure environment where your pet dog can play freely so they’re happy and you have peace of mind. Here are some tips on how to make a dog-friendly garden.

How to Make A Dog-Friendly Garden

ADD

  • Security. The number one thing you can do to your garden is ensure all the fences, hedges and gates are secure. Board up any holes to prevent your pets escaping – or passing animals coming in. Screening rolls are an easy way to patch over gaps.
  • Robust plants. Dogs often jump through your flower beds so make sure the plants can survive a certain amount of trampling. Varieties such as rubella, marigolds and geraniums are good options.
  • Pathways. Another way to protect your plants is by creating walkways through them or growing in raised beds so your dog can explore without causing havok.
  • Dog rocks. Adding these handy pellets to your pooch’s drinking bowl can help prevent yellow patches on the lawn.
  • Space to play. Try to leave plenty of grassy area for your dog to chase its favourite ball and run around.

puppy outside

AVOID

  • Poisonous plants. Watch out for any of your favourite plants that can upset your dogs if they eat them. Examples include delphiniums, foxglove, ivy and rhododendron.
  • Harmful pesticides. Dogs will eat anything – including any toxic slug pellets you leave out in the flowerbeds.
  • Pond additives. Dogs will also drink anything – so be careful adding chemicals to ponds and other standing water.
  • Sharp objects. Birds often drop small shards of bone on the lawn, which can injure your dog’s insides if they chew them. So give the grass a once over, and keep an eye out if the mutt starts eating something suspicious.
  • Unprotected compost bins. Some of our food waste like grapes is poisonous to canines, so make sure you have a lid on your compost bin to keep off any inquisitive animals. Depending on how resourceful your dog is, you may need a lock too!

dog in garden

Hopefully these ideas will help you keep your dogs secure, safe and protected from any harmful substances. If you have any other suggestions then be sure to let us know. In the meantime, enjoy your dog-friendly garden!

Learn how to make a wildlife-friendly garden.

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

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