Gardening, How To, Liam, Planting, Trees

How to Plant a Containerised Tree

Planting a tree is a decision made with many, many years in mind. With that being said it is essential to give your young tree the best possible start so it can grow to its full potential. With this guide we will show you how to plant a containerised tree.

 

A benefit you get with a containerised plant over a bare root one is that you can plant it at any point in the year. As long as your soil isn’t frozen or waterlogged your plant should be able to establish itself regardless of the season.

1. Before taking the tree out of its pot give it a good water. If you are planting the tree during spring or summer then it is essential to make sure it is well watered as the tree is yet to establish itself fully.

2. When picking a site for your tree, ideally you will want somewhere which is going to receive full sunlight and will be sheltered from harsh, drying winds. Make sure you pick a spot where the roots will have a chance to grow and spread out. If training against a wall then leave at least 1ft of space from the base of the plant.

3. Dig a hole with a diameter roughly 3x the size of the root ball and with the same depth. If planted too deep the lower trunk of the tree may become susceptible to disease; the graft-point should be just above the ground.

A square hole allows for the greatest root penetration and growth, especially for containerised plants whose roots are used to growing around in a circle. Loosen up the soil at the bottom of the hole with a fork and also the sides if they appear compact.

4. Take the soil you have dug and mix in compost so that it is three parts original soil, one part compost. You can add some further compost to the bottom of the hole and then fill in with your soil. There is no need at this point to apply a fertiliser, you can however sprinkle around the roots with mycorrhizal fungi (Rootgrow) to stimulate root-growth.

5. Place your tree in the hole and the fill in with your soil. Every now and then gentle heel in so that the soil is touching the roots. Air circulation is essential so don’t compact the soil too much.

6. You can plant a stake by the side of the rootball to give the tree some additional support if required. For a containerised tree we recommend two stakes as they require additional support. If planted in a sheltered site it may not be required and we advise not using a stake to improve the tree’s strength and flexibility. See our guide to staking trees.

7. After this you can form a bowl with the soil around the tree and fill with water. This will ensure the water doesn’t spill off and go directly to the roots. In the first several years it is important to look after and regularly water your young tree especially through periods of extended heat. Once the roots have grown out and the tree has established itself it will require less maintenance.

With this you have done your part in ensuring a long and happy life for your tree. You can also apply a mulch around the base to help it retain moisture, protect the roots and fend off weeds and disease.

Liam at PrimroseLiam works in the buying team at Primrose. He is passionate about studying other cultures, especially their history. A lover of sports his favourite pass-time is football, either playing or watching it! In the garden Liam is particularly interested in growing your own food.

See all of Liam’s posts.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Share!