Decoration, Garden Design, Garden Furniture, Gardening, Geoff Stonebanks, How To, Planters, Plants

My multi-award winning garden, Driftwood, is located by the sea in Sussex, on the coast between Brighton and Eastbourne. Over the years it has seen 14500 visitors and raised £76000 for charity. Last year it featured on BBC Gardener’s World and was a finalist in Gardeners’ World Magazine, Garden of the Year Competition too. Every year it is a challenge to create a variety of garden rooms that looks a little different, so the many returning visitors see something new and fresh. In order to create a flexible and fairly easy to change garden, I’ve always used terracotta containers of all sizes. I’ve probably got a collection of over 150 now. I’ve never been keen on plastic ones, they just don’t look at home in the garden, whatever the colour. OK I hear you say, the advantage is that they are not as heavy as the real thing, but there really has never been any competition for me, despite the weight! Now roll on the years, I’m 64 this month and I’ve been forced to reconsider how I create a different look in the garden this year. I’ve been using a trolley in recently to move containers around , but even that has started to get more difficult, especially in a garden on a slope with several steps to negotiate.

driftwood garden

So, this year I decided I needed to try and ease the burden, by investigating some lightweight pots that still looked like terracotta. The obvious place to check on line was Primrose, as they seem to stock everything anyone could need for the garden, and I have purchased quite a few things from them over the years. 

Two areas of the garden that rely very heavily on the use of containers, are these central steps in the garden and the patio area at the back of the house, which resembles a wall of plants on either side, like corridor of plants!

On investigation, I found what looked like the perfect solution! The fibre clay containers seemed to fit the bill perfectly for the steps, as I needed to find ones that were the right size to sit perfectly on the brick steps. They look absolutely at home, even before they have been filled with annuals for the summer season. These containers are all 30 cm tall and will work well, creating the waterfall effect I need to achieve. Look at last years results to see what I aim to create.

Fibrecotta Troughs

On the other hand, at the back of the house, one of the features I had within the wall of flowers was an old Victorian wooden cart which sat under a large potted camellia. On moving it to tidy up last month, it disintegrated and I’m left with the 2 axles and a side panel. I therefore needed to fill a large space, so two fibre clay containers, the tall one 64 cm tall and the lower one 37 cm tall. They look amazing in the space already . Granted, these are so big they will probably never be moved but all the others are perfect for ease of movement each year as needed. I also needed 3 troughs to sit on tiered shelving as part of this area of the garden. The 3 from Primrose fitted perfectly, which will also make life a lot easier. Just imagine how they will look when we open the garden gate to our first visitors on the 11th June. The garden is open 14 times for public days this year but also by arrangement from 1st June until 3rd September. If you live around Sussex, or are planning holidaying in the area this year, why not come and visit the garden yourselves. Full details can be found at www.driftwoodbysea.co.uk 

Look out for the next blog this Summer, so you can see what the containers look like when our visitors view them in the Summer.

Geoff StonebanksGeoff Stonebanks lives in Bishopstone, near Seaford in East Sussex and spends all his time gardening and fundraising for Macmillan Cancer Support. Using his multi award-winning garden, Driftwood, he has raised over £76,000 for various charities in 7 years, £40,000 of that for Macmillan. The garden, which first opened to the public in 2009 has featured on BBC2 Gardeners’ World, Good Morning Britain and in many national and local media publications. In his spare time, Geoff is also the National Garden Scheme’s Social Media & Publicity Chair as well as an Assistant County Organiser & Publicity Officer in East & Mid Sussex.

Brian Rees, Decoration, Garden Design, How To

When you have a standard fence, it might seem too staunch or generic next to your artistically designed home and lawn. To help your fence match your design ideals without building a new one, there are several amendments that can be made without using a lot of tools. Although some of these project ideas are more advanced than others, all of them are suggestions that can become the curb appeal solution you have been looking for.

Fence in garden design

Beyond a simple coat of paint

Although adding a fresh coat of white paint to any fence makes it look clean, the white color might not fit in as well with your overall curb appeal as well as another one. Instead, consider using an exterior paint that will provide contrast against your current house paint color. For solid wooden fences you can also create a mural effect by using each individual fence post as one solid canvas.

Using the power of zip ties and decorations

Many fences cannot withstand a lot of extra weight from items hanging on them without shifting over time. However, decorations can be placed on the ground and leaned against two fences with ease. To create some extra security, use zip ties to hold the decorations in place. Good examples are large wooden stars that are repeated in a pattern along a fence in order to provide decorations that are appropriate for the lawn.

Having fun with DIY molded concrete features

Decorating a brick, stone or masonry fence may not be easy until you get a taste of custom concrete lawn decorations. In many instances, molds can be purchased online, and making a small batch of concrete is easily done with a bucket and a stick. Once the concrete is poured into the mold and sets, the end result is a decoration you can use for your current stone fence. In addition to plain concrete finishes, you can also paint concrete.

Creating a false hedge or window

When you need a strong fence but hate the way it looks, putting something in front of it is often the best solution. For example, by soaking long twigs, you can weave them onto poles to completely conceal your current fence to create a look that resembles ordered bramble. Other ways to conceal a fence include using strips of canvas fabric to hang on the fence as if they were curtains hiding a large door or window.

Decorative screening rolls

In the same vein, you can also get rolls of decorative garden screening to attach to your fence. Simply fix them in place and your existing fencing will be hidden, replaced by something much more attractive. It’s great for quickly creating a different feel, such as using bamboo screening to enhance an oriental theme or willow for an English country garden.

bamboo screening

Using ropes to create decorative effects

If you want your fence to create a visual backdrop but do not have a lot of money to spend on something that will get stolen or will blow away, consider buying some rope and doing some macrame. While it might take some tinkering with cheaper nylon rope to get the design you want, there are many simple knots that can be beautiful decorations for fences when the right type of rope or silk cord is used. Along with making knots, other items can be used to cinch two pieces of rope together to create a netted or quilted effect. For a more dramatic effect, use a larger diameter of rope.

Choosing the right creeping plants

When you have a fence that is difficult to decorate and local neighborhood housing codes deny your ability to decorate your fence in the way you want, the only remaining option is to pick something that will grow into and over your fence. Instead of picking a typical rosebush or boxwood hedge, consider using other types of unexpected plants that give you the height you are looking for. Good choices include newer types of grasses as well as classics like bamboo or Bermuda grass.

Hanging baskets on fences with no plants

Do you have a fence that looks boring and also hangs out in the dark all night? You can kill two birds with one stone by decorating a fence with hanging baskets, a but instead of putting plants inside of them, strings of LED lights can be used. In addition to metal hanging baskets overflowing with LED lights, there are also larger rectangular planters with open framing that can allow for more creativity when filled with outdoor LED light strings.

Using bamboo poles to create curb appeal

One of the hardest fences to decorate is the chain-link fence. While some chain-link fences have decorative plastic woven into the metal frame, these pieces soon crack, fade or become displaced. A better and sturdier solution is to weave pieces of green or freshly cut bamboo into the chain-link fence. If weaving the bamboo is not working, using string to tie bamboo to the chain-link fence is often just as beautiful to onlookers.

Brian ReesBrian Rees is a media relations representative for Exterior Expressions. In his spare time, he enjoys writing, music, and spending time outside.

Decoration, Garden Design, Garden Furniture, Gardening, How To, Water Features, Zoe

It can be difficult to make the most of your space in a small garden without the effect feeling claustrophobic. There are a number of reasons your garden may feel small:
• High imposing walls or fences surrounding your garden
• Lack of natural light making the space feel dark and small
• No interesting colour incorporation to brighten the area
• Oversized garden furniture that overpowers the area
• Abundance of overgrown greenery
• Or simply a very small space to work with

This guide can help you with some space saving and trendy ideas that will help transform your small garden into a light and relaxing place to be, that still offers plenty of opportunity to test your gardening skills.

Mirrors

The use of mirrors in a small garden can really help to create a sense of space as the light reflects off the glass and into the outdoor area. There are many options to suit your individual style, whether it is a country garden or modern social space.
One way to incorporate mirrors is to have two identical mirrors facing each other; this will create the feel of an infinite garden and prov
ide a great opportunity to make the most of natural lighting.

 

Alternatively, you can use an ornate garden window mirror that adds character and charm. If you’re feeling crafty you could create this yourself with recycled window shutters!
The use of mini mirrors can incorporate light into the garden in a more subtle way, whilst creating a unique texture. The combination of outside fairy lights trailing along your mirrors can also create a lovely atmosphere in the evening.

If you want to learn more about the safety aspects of garden mirrors check out our previous blog post!

 

 

Stainless Steel Planters

If you’re not keen on using mirrors, stainless steel planters offer an excellent alternative. These will help to make the surrounding space seem bigger, and do not pose the same risks as mirrors do outside.
Try creating some depth in your small garden by adding plants of different heights in your planters, this will create a layered effect and also make the space appear larger.

Water

A water feature can be a great way to add some personality to your garden, and is a great tool to carry through a theme in your garden whether it is a classic country style, oriental theme or an ultra-modern layout.

However, the fantastic thing about water features in small gardens is the opportunity to incorporate light into a space, similarly to mirrors and stainless steel. The water from the feature will reflect the sky, and is a more natural way to reflect light into your garden. One bonus of this is that this may encourage wildlife too!

Trees

In a small garden the addition of trees can create the illusion of space. You can cleverly train certain trees to grow in a particular direction to help cover an ugly wall, and make the space seem less imposing. This may require a bit of patience in order to achieve the desired results however!

Vertical Planting

There are many other little ways you can make the most of your secluded spots through the use of vertical planting. This can be
achieved through Trellis’ and climbing plants, which will grow upwards and help hide walls.

However, for an easier option you could purchase a wall mounted planter that can attach easily to a wall and still optimise vertical space.

Screening

If you have dark walls or fencing surrounding your garden, this may be another reason the space feels so small. Sometimes the colours can have the effect of feeling gloomy or oppressive, but one easy way to brighten your garden is the addition of some screening.

This is easy to put up, and can also cover any broken brickwork or blemishes. There are a range of materials and colours to choose from, but a natural style bamboo screening could really help to boost the feeling of space by brightening the whole area and adding some personality.

Storage Solutions

If you’re short of space in your garden but still want to have a chill out area there are a range of storage solutions that can help you do that.
Seating with storage space built in is one particularly clever way to create more space in your garden as it is not visible. This gives you the option to have an area to relax but also be able to store away things such as blankets, cushions etc. when they are not needed!

You could also use coffee tables with storage built in as an alternative to bulky sheds and storage boxes, this would be a great addition to a social space so your guests can relax with a couple of drinks after you’ve stored away some of your garden necessities!

Hopefully this guide has inspired you to make the most of the space you have, and if you want to explore design tips for lighting your small garden be sure to read our advice on this too!

Zoe at PrimroseZoë works in the Marketing team at Primrose, and is passionate about all things social media.

After travelling across Europe and Asia, Zoë is intrigued by different cultures and learning more about the world around her. If she’s not jet setting, Zoë loves nothing more than curling up with a good book and a large glass of red wine!

She is an amateur gardener but keen to learn more and get stuck in!

See all of Zoë’s posts.

Amie, Decoration, Events, Garden Furniture, Gardening, How To, Make over, Media, Primrose.co.uk, Sail Shades, TV

Our Kookaburra Shade Sail on Love Your Garden!

Did you watch Love Your Garden on ITV last night? If so, did you spot our shade sail?

Last night’s episode featured a garden renovation in Eastleigh near Southampton, whereby an ‘uninviting patch of uneven lawn’ transformed into a wonderful cruise ship-inspired heaven for Rosie and her husband Tony; the theme truly fitting for the location given Southampton is the cruise hub of the country.

Rosie has spent over 38 years looking after and nursing sick and ill children, so is rightly deserving of this makeover, whereby she can spend hours relaxing in her retirement. The idea behind a cruise theme transpired from her and her husband’s love of cruising in her spare time, and as she says ‘it was the only time I felt I was able to relax’.

test2

One of the key features of this new garden was a shady seating area for relaxation, and what better accessory for this than our very own ‘Kookaburra Shade Sail‘ – Alan has great taste. The ultra-tight weave of the fabric has been independently tested to UPF34+ making these sail shades near impenetrable by sunlight. More than 96.5% of harmful UV rays are blocked out as a result, making it a perfect spot for Rosie and her family to spend many a summer day under.

test1

What a great end product I think you would all agree?

Watch the full episode now to see the finished garden.

AmieAmie is a marketing enthusiast, having worked at Primrose since graduating from Reading University in 2014.

She enjoys all things sport. A keen football fan, Amie follows Tottenham Hotspur FC, and regularly plays for her local 5 a side football team.

Amie also writes restaurant reviews on  Barnard’s Burger Blog.

 

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