Amie, Garden Screening, Gardening, Media, TV

Last night Love Your Garden renovated a WW2 veteran’s garden in Eastbourne in what was a very humbling and moving episode.

Jack, who was a prisoner of war involved in the construction of the ‘Death Railway’ between Bangkok and Myanmar, had left his home aged only 15 to join the Royal Artillery. He also had a passion for art. It was his love of art which allowed Alan Titchmarsh and his team to incorporate Jack’s own artwork into thenew garden design. Since the passing of his wife, he had difficulty in maintaining his garden and accessing his art studio. Featuring not only a breakfast table, a fish pond and tropical plants, Alan and co created a new art studio for Jack to enjoy his art for many years to come.

Also making an appearance were Primrose’ very own  white bamboo screening. It had been chosen to clad an area of Jack’s garden to create a tropical feel. Due to it’s ease of installation, robustness and longevity, it created a perfect disguise  for Jack’s existing fence. The final results look wonderful, wouldn’t you agree?

Click here to see our thick white bamboo screening as used in Love Your Garden.

Or if you need to catch up with Love Your Garden on the ITV Hub player, click here.

AmieAmie is a marketing enthusiast, having worked at Primrose since graduating from Reading University in 2014.

She enjoys all things sport. A keen football fan, Amie follows Tottenham Hotspur FC, and regularly plays for her local 5 a side football team.

Amie also writes burger reviews on  Barnard’s Burger Blog.

Garden Screening, George, New Products, News, Primrose.co.uk

As one of the UK’s leading garden screening specialists, we’re always looking for ways to innovate with new types of decorative screens. This week we’re launching a new range of artificial screening: reed and willow.

Artificial reed screening

Artificial reed screening

These artificial reed rolls recreate the sleek, modern look of natural reed screening but with the durability and fade-resistance of plastic.

If your garden’s in need of a quick refresh then this kind of screening is perfect. It’s versatile – simply attach to an existing fence for decoration or added privacy. Installation is easy and from then on the artificial screening is very low maintenance.

Artificial willow screening

Artificial reed screening round

We offer artificial willow screening in two different kinds – round canes and oval canes.

These both have the same natural feel as real willow – but without the maintenance. They’re quick to install, UV protected and can be wiped clean as required.

 Artificial reed screening oval

We’re very exciting to be bringing these new types of screening to the market and hope you like them as much as we do!

Take a look at the complete range of artificial screening – including bamboo and hedging.

Learn how to install garden screening – it’s a lot easier to fit than you might think.

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

Garden Design, Garden Screening, George

Natural fencing ideas

Every garden needs fencing – to mark the boundaries, divide up spaces and provide privacy. But there’s no need to settle for standard wood slatted fences. There are plenty of natural fencing ideas to give your garden borders an edge, fences that stand tall and stand out from the neighbours’.

Let’s kick off with a few alternative fencing ideas.

Willow Hurdles

1. Hurdle fencing

Hurdles are a form of freestanding fence made from handwoven wooden branches, usually willow or hazel. They offer a very rustic look, perfect for a countryside style garden. Willow hurdles are woven from younger, thinner wands, while hazel use thicker branches for a more sturdy feel. Ideal for bordering off any piece of land, they can bring a slice of rural design to even a compact urban garden.

Garden Screening

2. Garden screening

Screening is a great way to refresh your garden look. It’s light and flexible enough to be fixed to existing fences, so you can easily bring a more natural aesthetic to any space. There are many different materials to choose, from rustic bark and willow to modern bamboo and reed. As well as being more interesting and decorative than regular fences, screening can provide additional privacy in overlooked spaces.

Living fence

3. Living fences

If you’re looking to achieve something a little more ambitious, try living fences or ‘fedges’. There are many different forms (aside from the standard hedge!) but one of the most common is woven willow. Plant a row of willow where you’d like your fence and then weave the branches together as they grow. This requires a bit more skill and patience than the other ideas but pays off with a truly unique border.

The benefits of natural fences

Aside from the organic visual appeal that will set your garden apart, there are a number of other benefits from natural forms of fencing. Many kinds are very sustainable. The wood for willow and hazel hurdles is coppiced, meaning branches are cut from new growths on the plant so they’ll regrow by the next year. Because of the natural air gaps in hurdle fencing, it also serves as a better windbreak than standard fences. Wind is dispersed through the gaps, alleviating the risk of the fence toppling over in blustery weather.

Natural fencing maintenance

Generally natural fences will age more than regular ones over time. If you like, you can treat the wood with fence preservative to maintain the initial colouring, or let it fade naturally. Provided they are well secured and not exposed to too much harsh weather, hurdles can last up to 10 years.

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George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

Garden Screening, George, How To, Make over

Screening is one of those great multipurpose garden accessories: it’s decorative, great for privacy and provides a boundary that every outdoor space needs. It’s also incredibly easy to put up yourself – all you need is some steel wire and a pair of pliers. So choose your favourite type of outdoor screening (bamboo, reed and willow are a few of our favourites!) and read on to learn how to install garden screening.

Garden Screening

Screening vs fencing

Many people confuse screening with hurdle fencing. It’s easy to do, as they’re both types of decorative borders often made from natural wood materials. The main difference is that hurdles are generally a freestanding fence, while screening comes in rolls and needs to be attached to existing walls or fencing.

Things you’ll need

  • Screening rolls and existing fence
  • Pliers
  • Galvanised wire, cable ties or staples

How to install garden screening

How to Install Garden Screening

  1. With the pliers, attach the screening roll to the fence by tightening the wire or cable ties around both the screening rods and the fence.
  2. You can also staple the screening to the fence posts, but for bamboo make sure to staple the wires that join the canes rather than the canes themselves or they will split.
  3. Bind the screening to the fence at regular intervals – every 50cm vertically and 10cm horizontally.
  4. This should ensure the screening is fixed taught and firmly held in place, even during windy weather.

How to put up garden screening as a freestanding fence

If you have no existing fence to attach your screening to, then you will need to create a framework first.Fixing Garden Screening

  1. Position 75x75cm wooden posts at most 2m apart along the length you desire.
  2. Join the posts with vertical rails every 50cm upwards.
  3. The posts should be twice the height of the screening roll, with half the length buried in the ground.
  4. Surround the bases with concrete at least 5cm thick on all sides.
  5. Then attach the screening to the frame as detailed above.

Fitted Garden Screening

We hope these instructions make putting up your garden screening as simple a task as possible. All it takes is a little DIY and you can enjoy a revitalised natural surround to your garden. If you have any tips from your own experience, please share them below!

 

 

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

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