Garden Screening, George, New Products, News, Primrose.co.uk

As one of the UK’s leading garden screening specialists, we’re always looking for ways to innovate with new types of decorative screens. This week we’re launching a new range of artificial screening: reed and willow.

Artificial reed screening

Artificial reed screening

These artificial reed rolls recreate the sleek, modern look of natural reed screening but with the durability and fade-resistance of plastic.

If your garden’s in need of a quick refresh then this kind of screening is perfect. It’s versatile – simply attach to an existing fence for decoration or added privacy. Installation is easy and from then on the artificial screening is very low maintenance.

Artificial willow screening

Artificial reed screening round

We offer artificial willow screening in two different kinds – round canes and oval canes.

These both have the same natural feel as real willow – but without the maintenance. They’re quick to install, UV protected and can be wiped clean as required.

 Artificial reed screening oval

We’re very exciting to be bringing these new types of screening to the market and hope you like them as much as we do!

Take a look at the complete range of artificial screening – including bamboo and hedging.

Learn how to install garden screening – it’s a lot easier to fit than you might think.

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

Garden Design, Garden Screening, George

Natural fencing ideas

Every garden needs fencing – to mark the boundaries, divide up spaces and provide privacy. But there’s no need to settle for standard wood slatted fences. There are plenty of natural fencing ideas to give your garden borders an edge, fences that stand tall and stand out from the neighbours’.

Let’s kick off with a few alternative fencing ideas.

Willow Hurdles

1. Hurdle fencing

Hurdles are a form of freestanding fence made from handwoven wooden branches, usually willow or hazel. They offer a very rustic look, perfect for a countryside style garden. Willow hurdles are woven from younger, thinner wands, while hazel use thicker branches for a more sturdy feel. Ideal for bordering off any piece of land, they can bring a slice of rural design to even a compact urban garden.

Garden Screening

2. Garden screening

Screening is a great way to refresh your garden look. It’s light and flexible enough to be fixed to existing fences, so you can easily bring a more natural aesthetic to any space. There are many different materials to choose, from rustic bark and willow to modern bamboo and reed. As well as being more interesting and decorative than regular fences, screening can provide additional privacy in overlooked spaces.

Living fence

3. Living fences

If you’re looking to achieve something a little more ambitious, try living fences or ‘fedges’. There are many different forms (aside from the standard hedge!) but one of the most common is woven willow. Plant a row of willow where you’d like your fence and then weave the branches together as they grow. This requires a bit more skill and patience than the other ideas but pays off with a truly unique border.

The benefits of natural fences

Aside from the organic visual appeal that will set your garden apart, there are a number of other benefits from natural forms of fencing. Many kinds are very sustainable. The wood for willow and hazel hurdles is coppiced, meaning branches are cut from new growths on the plant so they’ll regrow by the next year. Because of the natural air gaps in hurdle fencing, it also serves as a better windbreak than standard fences. Wind is dispersed through the gaps, alleviating the risk of the fence toppling over in blustery weather.

Natural fencing maintenance

Generally natural fences will age more than regular ones over time. If you like, you can treat the wood with fence preservative to maintain the initial colouring, or let it fade naturally. Provided they are well secured and not exposed to too much harsh weather, hurdles can last up to 10 years.

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George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

Garden Screening, George, How To, Make over

Screening is one of those great multipurpose garden accessories: it’s decorative, great for privacy and provides a boundary that every outdoor space needs. It’s also incredibly easy to put up yourself – all you need is some steel wire and a pair of pliers. So choose your favourite type of outdoor screening (bamboo, reed and willow are a few of our favourites!) and read on to learn how to install garden screening.

Garden Screening

Screening vs fencing

Many people confuse screening with hurdle fencing. It’s easy to do, as they’re both types of decorative borders often made from natural wood materials. The main difference is that hurdles are generally a freestanding fence, while screening comes in rolls and needs to be attached to existing walls or fencing.

Things you’ll need

  • Screening rolls and existing fence
  • Pliers
  • Galvanised wire, cable ties or staples

How to install garden screening

How to Install Garden Screening

  1. With the pliers, attach the screening roll to the fence by tightening the wire or cable ties around both the screening rods and the fence.
  2. You can also staple the screening to the fence posts, but for bamboo make sure to staple the wires that join the canes rather than the canes themselves or they will split.
  3. Bind the screening to the fence at regular intervals – every 50cm vertically and 10cm horizontally.
  4. This should ensure the screening is fixed taught and firmly held in place, even during windy weather.

How to put up garden screening as a freestanding fence

If you have no existing fence to attach your screening to, then you will need to create a framework first.Fixing Garden Screening

  1. Position 75x75cm wooden posts at most 2m apart along the length you desire.
  2. Join the posts with vertical rails every 50cm upwards.
  3. The posts should be twice the height of the screening roll, with half the length buried in the ground.
  4. Surround the bases with concrete at least 5cm thick on all sides.
  5. Then attach the screening to the frame as detailed above.

Fitted Garden Screening

We hope these instructions make putting up your garden screening as simple a task as possible. All it takes is a little DIY and you can enjoy a revitalised natural surround to your garden. If you have any tips from your own experience, please share them below!

 

 

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

Garden Design, Garden Screening, George, How To, Sail Shades

If you live in a city or terraced house, you know how difficult it can be to relax in your garden without the feeling you’re being overlooked by neighbouring windows or passers by. With summer fast approaching, now’s the time to prepare your outdoor space so that you can make the most of it without the fear of prying eyes. We’ve put together a list of garden privacy ideas that you can easily try out at home to stop your garden being overlooked – without compromising on the natural aesthetics and your outdoor designs.

Garden Privacy Screen

1. Garden privacy screens

Garden screening is a simple, quick and attractive way to shield off part of your garden. It’s great for terraced houses with low fences or wire dividers between gardens. Choose the type of screening that suits your taste – bamboo, willow or artificial to name a few – and attach it to an existing fence or trellis for a privacy boost. Creating a beautiful enclosed area to relax in has never been so easy!

 

 2. Hanging sail shadesSail Shade

Of course, often you won’t be exposed necessarily by the fences in your garden, but by overlooking windows from the houses next door. This is especially common in city streets, where the houses are packed so tightly together that it’s hard to find somewhere to sit in your garden where you don’t feel watched. Hoisting up a sail shade or two over you patio is an ingenious solution. The best part is you can easily just put them up for the summer months, when you want to sit outside under a little shelter from the sun – and any prying eyes.

 

Living Wall

3. Living wall

It’s a classic solution but one of the best: put up a border of trellis and allow some climbing plants to grow up it. This will create an attractive, organic barrier between you and any gaps where people can peep through into your garden. If you’re overlooked by any upstairs windows, then combining the trellis with a pergola over your patio, decking or seating area will give you a perfect private enclave once the plants have grown across. Clematis or ivy are good climbing vines to choose.

 

Hedge

4. Privacy planting

If you need a free standing barrier to shield off part of your patio, try making a wall out of tall planters. Choose any such pots in the style you like and fill them with big plants or trees for maximum shelter. Growing your own screening is another age old solution to the problem of being overlooked. Add height to your fences with an additional border of fast growing hedges like the evergreen yew. Or for an alternative that lets in a bit more light, plant some bamboo. Of course, bamboo can often spread out of control but clumping varieties are known for being more contained, or just plant the bamboo in containers.

 

Water Feature

5. Sound barriers

In the modern age of urban living, we are often so crammed that when you’re outside in the garden you end up hearing every word from your neighbours – and knowing they can hear you too. A great way to create some psychological shelter is by using a water fountain or two so the sound of their running water will mask your conversation as well as the noises from next door.

Let us know if you have any more suggestions for making your garden more private and we hope you find these tips helpful!

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

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