Gardening, Grow Your Own, Guest Posts, Herbs, How To, Planting, Plants, Promotions

Herbs In Pot

“Herbs are the friend of the physician and the pride of cooks.” 

– Charlemagne.

For years we’ve known herbs add wonderful depth to our dishes and perform miracles for our health. So with the cold weather now on its way, follow these essential indoor herb growing tricks to ensure your kitchen brims with luscious and rich herbs this autumn.

Engulf them with sunlight

Herbs On Windowsill

Whilst they can look superb perched up in the nooks of your kitchen, the key to herb growing is light. Herbs want lots of it. You want to provide your herbs with at least 6 hours of sunlight – so place them close to a window. Preferably an east facing window, as this will bathe them in a healthy dose of morning light daily, weather permitting!

Basil really loves sunlight. But for winter time or a more shaded location, you’ll find parsley will become your friend.

Regular, consistent water

Watering Can

When you grow herbs indoors you must remember Mother Nature can no longer give her helping hand – water sources such as rain and morning dew are no longer accessible to your plants. This means you must be extra vigilant to provide regular water. Make sure the soil of your herb garden is always damp.

Always water the soil and roots of your herbs, not the top of the plant where water can quickly evaporate in the warmth of your home. This way the soil will retain much more moisture.

Container advice

Indoor Herb Growing Planter

Herbs will be pretty happy in most containers, providing they have plenty of soil per herb. Herbs suck your soil dry of water fast, so the more soil, the more moisture they will have access to. Especially if you are anything like me and forget to water now and again, an indoor windowsill herb garden planter will hold plenty of soil and retain lots of moisture. This means the herbs will be much more forgiving!

Food for food

Herbs On Chopping Board

Should you be feeding your herbs? Absolutely. As you’ll eventually be using these herbs for consumption we suggest you pick a chemical free fertiliser and apply lightly to your herbs every two weeks. You should avoid over fertilising – this can prevent the creation of the herb’s essential oils, reducing their flavour – and who wants to eat bland herbs?

Whatever level you are, there’s a home-grown herb out there for you

For beginners we suggest buying baby herb plants so you don’t have to worry about the germination process. Oregano is incredibly forgiving and grows well even in poor soil. Other herbs we recommend are parsley, mint, chives & thyme.

If you’ve grown herbs before, try growing annual herbs from seed. Leafier herbs will germinate fairly fast so look out for basil, coriander & dill.

If you consider yourself a herb connoisseur, we suggest bulking out your indoor garden with some more exotic and unusual plants. You can grow the quite adaptable Stevia from cuttings or a small plant – now used quite commonly as a natural alternative to refined sugar.

It’s ‘thyme’ to get growing!

Feeling inspired? Check out National Garden Gift Vouchers who are currently running a Herb Garden Competition to help promote growing year-round goodness. They are giving away 25 herb garden packs brimming with thyme, sage, mint, coriander and basil until the end of December 2015.

Find out more on their website: competition.thevouchergarden.co.uk.

Tony StaceyTony Stacey is Marketing Manager at the Horticultural Trades Association (HTA), the organisation who administer the National Garden Gift Voucher Scheme. HTA are the leading trade association representing the UK garden industry. Tony is incredibly passionate about promoting gardening campaigns to children and non-gardeners to get the nation more green fingered and inspired to grow their own food.

Bulbs, Flowers, Gardening, Gardening Year, Geoff, Grow Your Own, How To, Infographics, Planting

You can have a colourful garden with flowers blooming all year round – just use our simple guide!

Knowing what to plant, when to plant it and where it grows best can be a tricky business. But if you want a colourful garden for every season, all you really need to get dug in are the flowering times. So we’ve created this infographic as a handy visual guide for when flowers bloom. Simply pick the plants for each season that will suit the conditions best in your garden. Then you’ll be sure to have luscious planting whichever time of year!

When Flowers Bloom Infographic

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GeoffGeoff works within the Primrose marketing team, primarily on anything related to graphics and design.

He loves to keep up with the latest in music, film and technology whilst also creating his own original art and his ideal afternoon would be lounging in a sunny garden surrounded by good food, drink and company provided there is a football nearby.

While not an expert, his previous job involved landscaping so he’s got some limited experience when gardening.

See all of Geoff’s posts.

Flowers, Gardening, George, Grow Your Own, How To, Planters, Planting, Primrose.co.uk

There comes a time when most plants will outgrow their pots. You may notice the flowers beginning to wilt or roots poking through the bottom of the pot. This means it’s time for the plant to move.

Here are three easy steps to repot your plant, along with a few pictures from our own attempts with the office plants at Primrose!

1. Prepare the new pot
When you know your plant is ready for a bigger home, make sure it’s well watered – this will help to ease it out. Choose a new pot that’s bigger than the old one. Line the bottom of the pot with a layer of compost and dampen it with some water.

Plant For Repotting
The roots are showing so this plant’s ready to go!

2. Take the plant out
This can be the tricky bit. You have to be careful not to damage the plant, so try to keep your palm placed over the soil with your fingers round the stem as you ease the plant from the pot. Give the pot a tap on a table or step to dislodge the roots. You may even need to break the pot away if they’re really stuck!

Taking Plant Out
And after a little work, the plant should just slide out.

3. Put the plant in its new pot
If the roots are especially compressed, you may need to work them out a bit – just use your fingers to loosen them up. Then place the plant into the new pot. It should fit in easily, with some free space around. Add a bit more compost to fill the gaps and give it all a good water.

Plant In New Pot
All settled in its new home!

So that’s it – 3 simple steps and your plant is repotted!

We particularly recommend our Miracle-Gro compost – you’ll only need a little because it expands up to 3 times with water. If you’re looking for plant pots we have a great range, starting from just 99p! And of course, if it’s plants you’re after, we’ve got you covered.

For more, visit primrose.co.uk.

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

Bulbs, Cat, Flowers, Gardening, Grow Your Own, Planters, Ponds, Primrose.co.uk

Primrose™ Pond in a Pot
One of the new Primrose developments – Pond in a Pot

An online garden retailer based in Reading is seeking to recruit a talented and experienced plants communicator to join our team.

Applicants need to be skilled and well versed with all flora. This is a great opportunity for an enthusiastic individual to join a company expanding their plants inventory. Established 12 years ago, the company is growing yet closely knit with a knowledgeable and friendly team.

Key responsibilities:

  • Able to hold one sided conversations with all types of plants.
  • Able to multitask – we have thousands of plants in stock ranging from spring planting bulbs, hedging and shrubs, bay trees, pond plants, exotic plants and fruit trees.
  • Able to speak using different dialects – some plants respond better to Scottish accents for example.
  • Able to react to changes needed, such as repotting plants into differently coloured planters if they indicate they don’t like the colour. You’ll need to have familiarity with our range of over 1000 planters to match the right pot to the plant.
  • Monitoring the success of the communications through monthly and ad hoc reporting.

Candidates ideally would be:

This is a great opportunity for anyone looking to take their plants knowledge to the next level and develop their career. Full support and on-the-job training provided.

Previous experience not required, but beneficial.

Pay will start at £35,000 – may be negotiable depending on experience

Please send your application or any queries to hello@primrose.co.uk.

Over 2600 Plants & Trees

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