George, News, Press Releases, Primrose.co.uk

  • Primrose recognised in third edition of London Stock Exchange’s 1000 Companies to Inspire Britain report
  • Identifies fastest-growing and most dynamic small and medium sized businesses (SMEs) in UK
  • Primrose.co.uk is one of the UK’s leading online garden retailers

1000 Companies to Inspire Britain

Online gardening company Primrose has been identified as one of London Stock Exchange’s 1000 Companies to Inspire Britain. The report is a celebration of the UK’s fastest-growing and most dynamic small and medium sized businesses.

To be included in the list, companies needed to show consistent revenue growth over a minimum of three years, significantly outperforming their industry peers.

Established in 2003, Primrose.co.uk has grown to become a £40m business and the leading online retailer specialising in the gardening sector. Primrose has developed a rich range of its own garden products as well as offering a comprehensive choice from other brands.

Speaking about the announcement, Primrose MD Ian Charles said, ‘We are delighted to be included in LSE’s 1000 Inspirational Companies report for the second year running. In the hugely competitive online market, creating the most innovative Garden products while simultaneously ensuring the best value for our customers is critical to success – it’s great to be recognised for that.’

Xavier Rolet, Chief Executive, London Stock Exchange Group said, ‘High growth SMEs are the driving force behind the UK economy, developing the skills, jobs and growth we need. But ambition alone is not enough; their success must be highlighted and their growth properly supported with appropriate finance.’

Writing in the publication, The Rt. Hon. George Osborne MP said, ‘UK high-growth businesses are leading the charge in rebuilding our economy. These companies are the backbone of the British economy. They create high-quality, well paid jobs, innovate and drive economic growth. This government fully understands the need to support ambitious entrepreneurs and ensure they can access the finance they need to grow.’

A full list of all of the companies along with a downloadable pdf of the publication can be found online at www.1000companies.com.

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

Awnings, Gardening Year, George, How To

Can Awnings Stay Outside All Year

Once an awning has been installed, most homeowners are keen to leave it up all year round. The main thing that could cause an issue if the awning is left outside all the time is weather and the damage this can potentially cause. So can awnings stay outside all year? The simple answer is usually yes, depending on how the awning retracts and the extremity of your local weather.

Which types of awning can be left outside?

When an awning is left retracted outdoors, it will still be subjected to wind and rain. Standard and half cassette models leave the canopy material partially open to the elements, so their durability will depend on the fabric being waterproof. For extra protection, the casing can be covered with a storage bag to ensure no rain gets in. Full cassette awnings are fully sealed when wound back, so these are perfectly prepared for being left outside all year.

Awnings should never be left open in extreme weather like heavy rain or strong winds as the arms may snap or the fabric rip. If you leave your awning open unattended, you can use an automatic sensor to retract the awning when it detects excessive rain or wind. Note that these will only work for electric awnings, so with manual ones you will need to keep an eye on them.

Can awnings be used in the rain?

The great thing about awnings is the way they transform your patio into a much more usable space when the sun becomes too strong, but with the changeable UK weather it’s nice to be able to stay under them for the occasional shower. Awnings can be left open in light rain as long as the fabric is waterproof. Primrose Awnings are made from 300 gsm acrylic or polyester material which is waterproof tested, so is fine in a spot of rain.

If you are going to leave your awning open in the drizzle you should be aware of the pitch. In order for the water to run off, the awning must be sloped at a minimum of 14 degrees. Otherwise rainwater can pool in the centre of the canopy and the weight of it risks tearing the fabric.

If you wind in an awning during the rain, remember to unwind it fully during the next sunny day to let the material dry off completely. Most awning fabrics are treated to prevent rot, so should be fine stored damp for a little while.

Another consideration is the wind, which often accompanies a downpour. Wind can be even more harmful to the awning structure and fixings so make sure not to leave it open if it is too windy. The general rule is if it’s too breezy to sit outside then the awning should be retracted.

If you need any further advice about choosing your awning, where to install it or how to look after it, please get in touch!

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

Garden Design, Garden Edging, Gardening, George, How To

Crisp, precise borders can really take your garden design to the next level. They’re tricky to get right and maintain by hand, which is where plastic or metal edging strips can be incredibly useful. It’s crucial to put your edging in properly to ensure turf borders resist erosion and your flowerbeds are free from weed and grass roots for many years to come. So we’ve put together a guide for how to install lawn edging in simple, clear steps.

How to Install Lawn Edging

1. Plan

Mark out the border that you want to edge – whether for a new flowerbed or to smarten up an old one. Measure it to work out what length of edging you’ll need to buy.

2. Dig a trench

For standard size in ground edging, you’ll need to dig a trough about six inches deep along the entire border. A regular trowel or spade should suffice for moist soil, but if the earth is dry then you may need a specialist border tool. You want sharp cuts without the dirt crumbling away from the turf.

3. Lay the edging into place

As rolled up, the strip should curve away from the lawn side of the trench. If there is a V-shaped lip at the base of the edging, this needs to be on the flowerbed side. Use a utility or serrated knife to cut the strip to size. If you are joining multiple strips, make sure each connector is evenly distributed in both pieces of edging, rather than being pushed into one during the connection. The strip should sit in the trench with only the very top visible. When it is set, this will be enough to prevent grass and weed roots crossing into the flowerbed, but not so high that it will get caught on your lawn mower. It will be obscured when the grass grows longer.

4. Pull down the soil

Use your hands to shift loose soil up against the edging from the bed side. The edging may not sit flat against all the curves in your lawn. Pull down more soil and stomp it into the edging with your feet to make sure it is held firmly in place to the turf.

Lawn Edging Pins

5. Hammer in the stakes

Starting three inches from the end of the strip, hammer the stakes into the edging from the flowerbed side. Make sure they are as close to a 90 degree angle to the edging as possible. This is to make sure they’re stable – if you pound the stakes straight down then the frost will eventually heave them upwards. You may need to scrape away some of soil to get the hammer and stakes in. Place the stakes every seven inches along the strip. If there are connections then also put them three inches on each side of the join.

6. Compact the soil

Push and stomp soil on the flowerbed side up ⅔ the height of the edging strip. Fill in any gaps on the lawn side with a bit of soil – eventually new grass should grow the cover these. Water the soil on both sides to compact it even more. Finally, top up with earth so that both sides are flat and level.

Hopefully this guide to using garden edging makes things clear. If you have any trouble, please get in touch.

Browse our range of lawn edging or get inspired by some lawn edging ideas.

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

George, How To, Water Features

Concerns about power sources and the safety of electricity around water are key for people choosing a water feature. There are various different power options available and garden water fountains are safe for general use.

Do Water Features Need Electricity

Do water features need electricity?

Yes, water features need electricity to pump the water round. Water features can be wired into the mains or solar powered. Many do not need to be plumbed into mains water and simply run off an internal reservoir.

Mains powered water features

Water fountains running on mains electricity can be placed almost anywhere in your garden, depending on the length of the cable. Of course, you can use outdoor extension leads if the supplied cable is not long enough for your desired location. Run the cable to an outdoor plug or a socket inside a shed or garage, then you can switch on your water feature whenever you desire or leave it running all the time. You can even bury the wiring underground, just be sure to use armoured cable trunking to prevent digging into it.

Solar powered water features

As well as being eco-friendly, the main benefit of solar water fountains is that they are completely self contained and free from cables. They take in sunlight through a panel which is either built in or placed beside the feature, and use this to power the flow of water. In order to run, these water features do need to be in direct sunlight, which may limit where you can place them in the garden. It’s also important to note that they do not usually store power, so the water will only be pumped round while the sun is out.

So whichever model you choose, your water feature will need a supply of electricity to keep the fluid pumping round. But you have the option of wiring your fountain into the mains power source or have it powered by the sun’s energy.

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

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