Christmas, How To, Zoe

how to care for your Christmas Tree

A real Christmas tree can be a beautiful centre piece during the festive season, and is certainly the object of admiration from family and friends who come to visit. But problems can arise when your tree starts to wilt in the heat, drop needles and lose its colour.

Did you know that when natural trees are stressed they begin to shed their needles in an effort to save themselves from dehydration?

In order to keep your tree in tip top condition, and avoid an abundance of needles across your floor, follow our easy steps to keep your tree looking fantastic through to New Year!


Top Tips

  • After you’ve picked your favourite tree you need to cut about half an inch off the bottom of the trunk. Someone may do this for you at the retailer, but if not you can do it yourself easily at home. This will let your tree absorb more water and remain fresher for longer.
  • Within eight hours of cutting the bottom of the tree you need to get it in water, and your tree will be very thirsty! Your tree may need up to 3 litres on the first day, and regular watering every day after this.
  • Do not remove any bark from the tree in an attempt to squeeze it into a container. Most of the water absorption comes from just under the bark, so your tree will dehydrate much quicker if you do this.
  • Some people suggest putting an aspirin in the water to help the tree, or perhaps fizzy drinks such as lemonade that will help your tree absorb some water and help it look extra lovely. BE CAREFUL putting aspirin in your water if you think a curious cat may want to have a sip from it however.
  • Allow your tree to rest for a while before you decorate it, the longer you can leave it the better, preferably twenty four hours.
  • If the foliage on your tree is quite dense, try snipping a few of the branches back to the trunk. This will create a tidier image, but will also save your tree from wasting water on more branches.
  • Place your tree in a cool place. Having your tree next to a fireplace or radiator will dry out your plant.
  • Try to use low voltage fairy lights when you decorate your tree. Larger lights will warm up the branches surrounding it and cause water loss.
  • Keep on top of collecting the fallen pine needles. These can be hazardous for infants or pets if swallowed or stuck in the skin!
  • Lastly, you might find using a Christmas tree spray may help to retain moisture in the branches. You could also try spraying hairspray on the underside of the tree, HOWEVER this will make the tree much more flammable so only do this with great  care.

Christmas Tree Decoration

 

If you follow these steps your tree should remain healthy for up to four weeks and be the envy of all your family and friends!

Haven’t bought your Christmas tree yet? Check out our expert advice on how to spot the perfect Christmas tree.

Zoe at PrimroseZoë works in the Marketing team at Primrose, and is passionate about all things social media.

After travelling across Europe and Asia, Zoë is intrigued by different cultures and learning more about the world around her. If she’s not jet setting, Zoë loves nothing more than curling up with a good book and a large glass of red wine!

She is an amateur gardener but keen to learn more and get stuck in!

See all of Zoë’s posts.

Celebrations And Holidays, Christmas, How To, Zoe

Real Christmas Tree

With the arrival of frosty mornings and Christmas songs on the radio, now is the time to consider what type of Christmas tree you want this year. Artificial trees are great value for money as they can be re-used for years to come, however many people still prefer the aroma and natural look of a real tree.

If you need a helping hand with spotting the perfect spruce or fir, here’s a comprehensive guide on picking the perfect natural tree to fill your home with festive joy all the way to New Year.

Which Christmas Tree?

Firstly, you need to decide what kind of Christmas tree you want this year, here’s a lowdown on the different types available.

Norway Spruce – This type of tree is often regarded as the traditional Christmas tree. It is pyramid in shape with mid to dark green needles, and is an affordable option. However, they tend to drop a lot of needles in an indoor environment.

Nordmann FirThis type of tree is often a very popular choice due to its strong branches and soft needles. It doesn’t tend to drop as many needles, and has dark green foliage.

Blue SpruceSimilar to the Norway Spruce, the Blue Spruce has stiff needles, but has a slight blue hue in the foliage. It is an elegant choice with better needle retention.

Fraser FirAlso a pyramid shaped tree, with soft foliage. This tree tends to be best for limited spaces as it is generally narrow with denser foliage.

Once you’ve decided which tree will best suit your home, you get to do the fun part of picking the tree! This can be a fun activity for the whole family to visit your local tree farm and get into the festive cheer.

Healthy Christmas Tree

Our Top Tips for Picking the Best Christmas Tree

  • If you’re able, try to visit a tree farm where you can pick a tree that’s still in the ground. This is preferable as this tree is likely to last much longer than a tree that’s been cut a while ago.
  • Measure! Before you leave your house to start your adventure remember to measure the space where you want to place the tree. And remember to leave a few inches at the top of the tree for a star/angel.
  • Before you leave the house, cover the floor where you want your Christmas tree to be. This will not only help to protect your floor but also absorb any water spillages once you start to water your tree.
  • Bring gloves with you to the tree farm. This is so the needles do not hurt you when you transport the tree home.
  • Now for the fun part…picking the tree! You want to look out for a tree with a bright, even colour throughout. This means it is healthy and happy.
  • Check the needles – give the tree a gentle shake and see how many needles fall. A little fall of needles is normal, but if there’s a lot it might be past its sell by date.
  • Another way to check the needles, especially with a Fraser or Douglas Fir, is to break off a needle and bend it in half. If it snaps that’s a good sign, if it is bendy that means the tree has been there a long amount of time.

Aftercare

Remember our tips and you’ll find the perfect Christmas tree this year!  Keep your eye out for our blog on ‘How to Care for Your Real Christmas Tree’ to keep it looking fantastic all through the festive period, coming soon!

Zoe at PrimroseZoë works in the Marketing team at Primrose, and is passionate about all things social media.

After travelling across Europe and Asia, Zoë is intrigued by different cultures and learning more about the world around her. If she’s not jet setting, Zoë loves nothing more than curling up with a good book and a large glass of red wine!

She is an amateur gardener but keen to learn more and get stuck in!

See all of Zoë’s posts.

Animals, Gardening, Guest Posts, How To, Wildlife, Zoe

How To Look After Hedgehogs
As the leaves are changing from green to golden and autumn seems to be surrounding us everywhere we know,
Wildlife from every nook and cranny is searching for somewhere to go.
As frost becomes bitter, and food becomes scarce, animals need a new home.
This guide will help you transform your garden into a safe haven, meaning no animal will be alone.

1 – Food, Glorious Food

Help our furry friends in the winter months by providing some scrummy food,
bacon rind, cheese, peanuts, seeds or fruit,
fatty foods make their tummies nice and full
but give them a mix of food and they will be grateful.

Once you’ve started please don’t forget to provide each day,
or our poor little birdies will waste away!
Keep in mind not all our birds can reach so high,
Leave treats on the ground for Robin’s so they don’t have to fly.

Our spiky friends often need a helping hand,
so leave out some cat food on a saucer if you can,
a bowl of water can will be good for a drink
for all animals looking to have a sip

How To Welcome Wildlife

2 – Hide and seek

These sweet little visitors might act a little shy,
and take cover in piles of leaves nearby,
so try to resist sweeping these up in a hurry,
or you’ll find that your visitors leave in a scurry.

The same can be said for your compost heap,
where frogs and toads like to sleep.
Remember to check your pond where frogs may be snoozing,
don’t let it ice over or you will be losing,
vital oxygen in the water! Melt this slowly and make a hole,
with a pan of hot water left to glow.

Other hiding places that can be used as a bed:
butterflies will use the corner of a shed!
Leave dry plant stems to stand tall,
and insects will begin to crawl,
into this place and not want to leave
until the sun appears on a summer’s eve.

Frogs In Your Garden

3 – Autumn Clean

The last thing you need to do, is get cleaning!
Make sure that your bird feeders are gleaming.
Your pond could do with a clear away at this time of year,
when activity has dropped and it is mostly clear.

Get ahead of the game and make your bird box clean,
so when spring comes birds can nest with ease.
One last tip we would like to share,
don’t cut back your hedges, so birds can live there!

Winter Garden Shed

Zoe at PrimroseZoë works in the Marketing team at Primrose, and is passionate about all things social media.

After travelling across Europe and Asia, Zoë is intrigued by different cultures and learning more about the world around her. If she’s not jet setting, Zoë loves nothing more than curling up with a good book and a large glass of red wine!

She is an amateur gardener but keen to learn more and get stuck in!

See all of Zoë’s posts.

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