Gardening, George, Grow Your Own, How To, Infographics, Planters, Planting, Plants

There’s nothing quite like the taste of fresh, juicy, homegrown fruit. Now’s the time to start on your own edible garden and space is no issue as many fruiting plants can be grown in pots. We’ve created a step-by-step infographic leading you through how to plant strawberries in containers to make it super simple!

And once you’re ready to go, check out our range of strawberry planters.

How to plant strawberries infographic

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Thanks to our graphic designer Becky for illustrating this beautiful infographic!

Catch up with our last infographic: How to Plant Potatoes in Containers. And stay tuned for Part 7 of The Complete Guide to Container Gardening: How to Grow Herbs in Pots, coming soon.

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

Media, News, Zoe

Last weekend the bravest employees at Primrose joined together to take on the Tough Mudder Half; our team consisted of employees from: Customer Services, Accounts, Marketing, Buying, IT and even our CEO!

Tough Mudder requires teams to work together to make sure everyone gets across the obstacles, and this was definitely the case with the ‘Pyramid Scheme’ obstacle. Our CEO and Head of Finance took one for the team and went at the bottom of the wall to help hoist everyone else up the pyramid to the top where more members pulled us up to safety. This obstacle would have been impossible to defeat on your own, but luckily the Primrose team found a way to get everyone over together.

We then all proceeded to get extremely muddy during the ‘Mud Mile’ obstacle which involves you wrestling through a mud pit and ensuring no one comes out clean!

Tough Mudder Mud Mile

To finish off, the team worked together to tackle ‘Everest 2.0’ in which you have to run as fast as you can up a curved wall hoping someone can catch you at the top. This was a particularly difficult challenge, but nevertheless there was always someone at the top to give you a hand up.

We had a fantastic time at this event and there was a great feeling of success when we crossed the finish line together, knowing we had done it all as a team. It was a great opportunity to get to know our colleagues better and also raise some money for the fantastic organisation Help for Heroes. Thank you to all of those that donated, at the time of writing this we’ve made £230 but if you would like to donate you can head to our Just Giving page, every donation makes a difference.

Now to start the training for next year…

 

Primrose Tough Mudder
The Primrose Tough Mudder team safely over the finish line!

Zoe at PrimroseZoë works in the Marketing team at Primrose, and is passionate about all things social media.

After travelling across Europe and Asia, Zoë is intrigued by different cultures and learning more about the world around her. If she’s not jet setting, Zoë loves nothing more than curling up with a good book and a large glass of red wine!

She is an amateur gardener but keen to learn more and get stuck in!

See all of Zoë’s posts.

Alex, Current Issues, Gardening Year, Plants

how to deal with frost

2017 has seen unprecedented weather challenges for growers. An extremely dry winter was followed by an unseasonably warm early spring. This encouraged plants to start throwing out shoots very early. We were then hit by very hard, very late frosts. To make it worse, the frosts were quite unexpected, coming during clear nights in late April off the back of good weather. The mercury plummeted to -6℃ in some rural areas and across the country, crops and gardens alike were hit hard.

Winemakers have suffered badly in the UK and across the continent. Up to 75% of some crops have been ruined by the cold snaps, with vineyards filled with huge candles to ward off the chill. In France, temperatures have dropped below -7℃, harming the new growths brought on by previous warm weather. Champagne may be in shorter supply this year, despite attempts to save crops with the down-draught from helicopters.

frosty vineyards

The frost was even more damaging as there was a lot of young, tender new growth triggered by the early warm weather which was particularly vulnerable. With many plants, the freeze decimated the new growth, killing it right back, and leaving plants looking very sorry for themselves indeed.

This is particularly bad for those of us expecting fruit crops this year, like the winemakers, who reported up to 50% of their crops may be lost and the rest delayed significantly. Strawberries, young tomato plants and other less hardy varieties that may have been moved out of the greenhouse too early on the back of the good weather, have also been wiped out throughout the country.

Late frost 2017

So what can we do to save our plants from the late frost?

  • Be prepared for unpredictable weather in the UK. Keep a close eye on the forecasts, with mild early springs followed by sudden chills the real killer.
  • Check out our tips for protecting plants against frost, including cloches, fleeces and greenhouses.
  • When moving plants outside after winter, do so carefully in stages to harden them off.
  • Choose some hardy plants like lavender and holly to keep some colour going in the garden whatever the weather throws at it.

AlexAlex works in the Primrose buying team, sourcing exciting new varieties of plants.

As a psychology graduate it is ironic that he understands plants better than people but a benefit for the purpose of writing this blog.

An enthusiastic gardener, all he needs now is a garden and he’ll be on the path to greatness. Alex’s special talents include superior planter knowledge and the ability to put a gardening twist on any current affairs story.

See all of Alex’s posts.

Events, Gardening, Louis, Primrose.co.uk

Regent's Park cherry blossom

Both Britons and the Japanese alike have a strong obsession with admiring a springtime blossom. As Juliet Roberts from Gardens Illustrated put it: “Blossom is a sure sign that spring has arrived. It has an innocent, simple beauty and its short lifespan is viewed by many cultures as a potent reminder of our own mortality.” This could be the reason that springtime blossoms intrigue us so deeply. Either that or just because it looks pretty.

There is no better (or prettier) blossom than that of the Japanese cherry blossom – a gorgeous spring display of the genus Prunus, varying in height, spread, habits, colours, prettiness, and so on. They are a symbol of destiny and karma in Japan, and the Japanese even have their own word for cherry blossom viewing: Hanami.

Luckily for us Britons, Japan and the UK share the same sort of climate which is just perfect for flowering cherry blossoms. It is not perfect, however, for the year-round avid short-wearers. That makes the UK an ideal place for growing these visually intoxicating trees. There are even a few places dotted around the country that offer an authentic Hanami experience.

Where to view

Royal Botanical Gardens – Kew, London


The ‘Cherry Walk’ is a gorgeous path leading through the Royal Botanical Gardens   lined with mature cherry trees like the intense-pink flowered Prunus Kanzan, or the pure-white flowered Prunus Tai-haku.

The Alnwick Garden – Alnwick, Northumberland


Boasting the largest collection of Prunus Tai-haku in the world, Alnwick Garden often encourages visitors to enjoy a picnic under its extensive collection of Japanese blossoming cherries.

Brogdale Farm – Faversham, Kent


Also home to the National Fruit Collection, Brogdale Farm offer Hanami picnics throughout April each year. It provides visitors with the opportunity to ‘enjoy a Japanese experience’ by viewing both an exhibition and a guided tour of the blossoming orchards.

Dining/nightlife

Sake no Hana – Mayfair, London


From March 20th to June 10th, Sake no Hana celebrates the cherry blossom season with a special ‘Sakura menu’ and an alluring installation of white blossoms which aim to ‘give guests a feeling of tranquility as if sitting beneath blossom trees’.

Roka – Fitzrovia, London


From April 26th to June 7th, the basement bar Roka is ‘transformed’ for six weeks with a cherry blossom installation, so you can enjoy contemporary Japanese food in an authentic Hanami setting.

Above are some of the best places to experience Hanami, so if you don’t want to dish out over five hundred quid on a plane ticket to Japan, there’s no excuse not to view a Japanese spring blossom.

Why not start planting a spring blossom in your garden? At Primrose we offer a huge range of ornamental cherry trees. Ranging from Cheal’s Weeping Cherry – a slender and pendulous plant, perfect for smaller gardens, or Prunus Kanzan, a large and elegant looking tree which is ideal as a statement piece if you have more space to play with.