Cat, Events

The MD is on the final stretchLast weekend saw the newly created annual wheelbarrow race for the Primrose staff.

The managing director and the marketing manager went head to head with wheelbarrows using the MD’s son as ballast.

The challenge was to see who could run fastest three times round the chicken coop.

The MD’s comments were:

The Marketing Guy chose a wider route with smoother corners, which may have contributed to his five second faster time, although I would like to point out that the Marketing Guy lost it at the first corner, spilling the precious cargo onto the grass and we had to restart the race.

So he didn’t really win at all.

The head of marketing commented:

I felt the precious cargo leant the wrong way to favour his father’s chances. However, running barefoot gave me an advantage and having shorter legs for shorter distance and start, the track favoured me.

Ultimately the MD got his revenge with a 3-0 thrashing at Table Tennis.

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

Cat, Celebrations And Holidays

Babies in the garden can be a tricky issue. Whilst it may seem straightforward to just have your toddler or little crawler in the garden with you, there are plenty of dangerous situations they can encounter.

In celebration of the birth of the royal baby, we at Primrose wanted to share our safety for babies in the garden tips with the couple. If you’ve got a toddler or young children coming round for the first time, it might be prudent to do a risk assessment of your garden, too.

  • Buckingham Palace GardensWhilst Buckingham palace gardens contains vast spaces of perfectly cut grass, there are balustrades framing the large patio area. Do you have any areas a baby’s head can easily get stuck in? Check your fencing!
  • Water is intrinsically linked not only with royal gardens, but most gardens in London feature a water feature or a pond area. What about your garden? Is your pond secured to stop the little angel from investigating it too closely?
  • The royal gardens are maintained by an army of landscapers, but most of us look after our own gardens. How well do you know your flowers and plants? Any poisonous plants? Deadly nightshade, lords and ladies, certain laburnums can all cause problems if eaten.
  • St James's Park Lake – East from the Blue BridgeWe’re sure that the royal baby will be well looked after by people concerned with giving it just enough sun, but we all know life doesn’t always work that way. An easy way to protect your child from the sun’s harmful UV rays is a shade sail which also wards off the rain during those frequent summer showers.
  • We’re sure every parent wishes to have a royal butler’s assistance once in a while, even just to tidy items away. Garden tools often contain sharp edges and your little one can easily sustain an injury. Put them in the shed!

What are your garden safety tips? What have we missed out on?

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

Animals, Children in the garden, Guest Posts, Nicole

Bee on sunflower
Today we went on a wildlife hunt in our garden but the only luck we had was getting a snap of a bee on our sunflowers. Not to be discouraged with finding so little besides the bee and our usual feathered companions we took the search further even looking for those pesky slimy plant munching pests aka slugs and snails, the idea being that we could see who found the biggest but my boys soon lost interest.

Venturing beyond the garden we took a walk to our local loch, bread in hand in hope of seeing the pair of swans which frequent it alongside the ducks. After trekking up to it battling endless hills (my town is built on hills and I’m sure everywhere we seem to go is an uphill climb) then having a little break to play in the local park we finally arrived at the loch ready to see some wildlife at last but the swans weren’t there!
Moorhen on loch
Thoroughly disappointed we threw the bread in anyway. My boys looked as downcast and downtrodden as the photographer next to us who must’ve trekked all that way for a picture to leave empty handed. The reason for the swans’ absence is perhaps the amount of dog walkers around because our local swans aren’t too keen on dogs at all.
Young moorhen chicks
Not wanting to see my boys so unhappy I decided we were not leaving until they got to see something… anything! After carefully explaining to them to get comfy, stay still and stay quiet we all waited patiently. It wasn’t long before something started moving among the reeds then ventured out for a nose, my boys were delighted! It wasn’t the swans but a collection of wee birds (I think it could be a moorhen and maybe it’s young?) we watched them run along the water and were rewarded with one of them coming up for a close look at us.
Butterfly on flower
Finally my boys were happy and we set out for home managing to get a picture of a lovely butterfly on the way. Tired from our wildlife hunt we reached our gate and were just about heading upstairs to our house when my neighbour shouted us. Curious we followed her into her garden and my boys kneeled down to look where she was pointing. Lo and behold there was a wee toad! Needless to say it made their day and ended our adventure with me thinking that maybe we should’ve just asked our neighbour for a look round her garden instead!Wee toad in neighbour's garden

Nicole

Charlotte, Guest Posts, Ponds

Charlotte and son by pondWhen purchasing our new home, my husband and I had mixed feelings regarding the pond. It’s petite, measuring less than a metre in diameter; however our concerns were more significant in size. With two young children we were worried about the risk of drowning. My father had already filled in his large pond and although I share his concern I was reluctant to destroy this precious habitat. A body of water, no matter how small, is one of the best ways to support wildlife in the garden. As our pond is overgrown with iris roots it’s barely 2 inches deep and is surrounded with plants to deter children from venturing too close. Thus, it was permitted to remain intact. Obviously it remains a hazard, so youngsters are warned of the dangers and monitored around the water.

I had little idea how valuable this small pool would prove to be until one spring morning when my eye was drawn to something twinkling in it. Closer inspection revealed that during the night an amphibious visitor had gifted us a batch of frogspawn. I was so excited I almost fell in trying to get a better view.
Adult Frog in Pond
I called over my toddler who, whilst thrilled, seemed a little perplexed. As a biologist I’m fascinated by the creation of life and thus got a little carried away describing, in detail, the frog life cycle. Clearly this was too much for a two year old to comprehend but after some simplification we classified the new arrivals as ‘baby frog’s eggs’. The most baffling part was how the frogspawn had found its way into our pond since we’ve never seen a frog nearby. We clearly hadn’t looked closely enough. Careful removal of a few rocks revealed a beautiful adult specimen. I’m no expert so was unable to determine its’ sex but it I’d like to think it was the female who laid the batch, keeping watch over her brood.
Tiny tadpole from pond
Keen to use this exciting development as a learning opportunity, we spent the afternoon reading every frog-related book in the house and downloading illustrations of their life cycle. Since then we’ve monitored our ‘babies’ regularly, observing the changes, drawing them and discussing their development. We took care to ensure the pond did not dry out during this critical period, topping it up regularly from our water butt. It was wonderful to witness the minute black specks growing larger and taking on the characteristic tadpole form before finally hatching out. Once this significant step had been taken I could be found, almost daily, leaning precariously over the water, ‘fishing’ for tadpoles.
Tiny little frog on leaf
Containing the tadpoles briefly in a jamjar allowed us to observe their growth, progressively losing the tail and sprouting legs. Our weeks of surveillance came to fruition when one ‘fishing trip’ caught more than anticipated. I’m not sure who was more surprised when a miniscule froglet leapt from a lilypad into the pond! Gently scooping up the tiny but perfectly formed amphibian, I presented it to my children, whose faces lit up with delight.
Baby frog on hand
I’m amazed how many have survived adulthood in such a tiny pool. It’s proof that even a small body of water can attract and support wildlife in the garden. I’m delighted we took the decision to retain our pond as it’s proved beneficial not only to the resident amphibians, but also to my family, who’ve gained great pleasure and knowledge from it. We anticipate more exciting experiences next spring, as the circle of life continues, and hopefully our little froglets return to spawn the next generation.

– Charlotte

Share!