Gardening, Gill, Greenhouses, Guest Posts

Hi,

Things are getting really exciting now as my ‘new greenhouse dream’ is actually happening. Last weekend my husband and I emptied the old greenhouse and took all the glass out, only smashing one pane! We moved the frame onto a flat surface which we are going to eventually cover with a sheet of clear polythene so I can continue to protect my new seedlings and reasonably established tomato plants which are at the moment cluttering the windowsills in the house.
Both water butts that were attached to the greenhouse had to be moved. We emptied the first one into a smaller butt and numerous receptacles and moved it to a safe place then filled it back up. We did the same with the second butt so feel happy now that we have not wasted any precious water.

The builders came and dug out the foundations which have now been filled with concrete. Now waiting for the weather to improve so the brick wall can be built ready for the greenhouse to be installed. Can’t wait.

Gill

Gardening, Greenhouses, Guest Posts, Peter

Peter’s Garden: On Cold Frames and Greenhouses

Welcome to the first in a new series of guest posts! We will be having gardeners from all over the country tell us about their gardening experiences. Our first guest blogger is Peter.

Plants in cold frame

After that warm March we had, everything seems to have ground to a halt. I have picked out quite a few of the bedding plants to put into the greenhouse, which is now pretty full. I must clear the other bench of some of the stuff – pots, seed trays, etc. – that has accumulated.  I have a good size cold frame, and the bedding plants that I have put there seem to be doing as well as the ones in the greenhouse, so I guess I can put more in there. My greenhouse is unheated, excepted for a thermostatically controlled electric heater that is set very low against frost. It never comes on when I am in there, so hopefully it does not cost too much.

Peter's Greenhouse

On the vegetable front, the leeks in the seed bed outside are just appearing, but the spinach beet and turnips are noticeable for their absence. Perhaps the seed was too old, but last year it seemed crazy to plan to grow 1500 turnips, so I had quite a lot of seed left over – still do, so there’s a chance for another sowing.

Peter's seedlings

Spent some time digging out some of those perennials that people have given us that get infested with weeds to give space for the bedding plants. Geraniums are one culprit (not the pelargonium geraniums).
Hazel bushes
Must cut some more hazel for the climbing French bean, grown for the first time last year with great success. So much more productive than dwarf French beans, easier to pick and out of reach of the slugs! Must cut the hazel this weekend before it comes into leaf. Too much to do, not enough time!

–Peter

Gardening, Quotations

Gardening Quotes to Think About

Gardening has inspired writers the world over, and many great minds have turned to the garden for peace, pleasure, or as a creative outlet. Here are some gardening quotes and sayings that we think you may enjoy.

Nature never goes out of style, gardening quote against fall leaves

“Nature never goes out of style.” — Anonymous

Earth laughs in flowers quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson writer against peacock and tulips garden

“Earth laughs in flowers.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

A gardener learns more in the mistakes beautiful garden quote by Barbara Dodge Borland

“A gardener learns more in the mistakes than in the successes.” — Barbara Dodge Borland

He that plants trees quote by Thomas Fuller against pine forest nature photo

“He that plants trees loves others beside himself.” — Thomas Fuller

Do you have any favourite gardening and nature related quotations? Share them with us in the comments!

Gardening, Hiring Help in the Garden, How To

Hiring help in the garden episode 3

Well….This is getting exciting. The keen garden labourer returned.  There was still debris in the ground.  I had dug over the entire plot 30 years ago…twice and got out 2 skips of rubble.  The section at the end only got one dig over, in a hurry.  The grass that had been down there was always poor and the ground hard and lumpy. I knew it was going to be hard going in this bit of garden, hence the need for help. This chap now took to the task with a vengeance.  He constructed a giant seiving system out of an old fire guard, several spades, the legs of a dead table and a grass rake. That started to take care of the filtering out of the rubble, but he excavated a trench that was remenicent of a Time Team excavation and has discovered so far: one wheel barrow, one tin bath and a timber shaft of some kind. Tune in next week to find out what it was.   — Wendy

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