Christmas

Every year, people up and down the country rock out their Christmas jumpers in aid of Christmas Jumper Day. It’s a time for everyone to unite, wear festive knits and take several snaps for social media to show off their silly sweaters.

But more importantly, it’s an opportunity to raise money for Save the Children UK – a great charity which promotes children’s rights,  provides relief and supports children in developing countries.

Primrose have done our bit for Save the Children so let’s see your sweaters!!

  • Email photos@primrose.co.uk
  • Tweet us @PrimroseUK
  • Facebook us @ facebook.com/Primrose.co.uk


Have a great Christmas from everyone at Primrose !

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AmieAmie is a marketing enthusiast, having worked at Primrose since graduating from Reading University in 2014.

She enjoys all things sport. A keen football fan, Amie follows Tottenham Hotspur FC, and regularly plays for her local 5 a side football team.

Amie also writes restaurant reviews on  Barnard’s Burger Blog.

 

 

Christmas, How To, Zoe

how to care for your Christmas Tree

A real Christmas tree can be a beautiful centre piece during the festive season, and is certainly the object of admiration from family and friends who come to visit. But problems can arise when your tree starts to wilt in the heat, drop needles and lose its colour.

Did you know that when natural trees are stressed they begin to shed their needles in an effort to save themselves from dehydration?

In order to keep your tree in tip top condition, and avoid an abundance of needles across your floor, follow our easy steps to keep your tree looking fantastic through to New Year!


Top Tips

  • After you’ve picked your favourite tree you need to cut about half an inch off the bottom of the trunk. Someone may do this for you at the retailer, but if not you can do it yourself easily at home. This will let your tree absorb more water and remain fresher for longer.
  • Within eight hours of cutting the bottom of the tree you need to get it in water, and your tree will be very thirsty! Your tree may need up to 3 litres on the first day, and regular watering every day after this.
  • Do not remove any bark from the tree in an attempt to squeeze it into a container. Most of the water absorption comes from just under the bark, so your tree will dehydrate much quicker if you do this.
  • Some people suggest putting an aspirin in the water to help the tree, or perhaps fizzy drinks such as lemonade that will help your tree absorb some water and help it look extra lovely. BE CAREFUL putting aspirin in your water if you think a curious cat may want to have a sip from it however.
  • Allow your tree to rest for a while before you decorate it, the longer you can leave it the better, preferably twenty four hours.
  • If the foliage on your tree is quite dense, try snipping a few of the branches back to the trunk. This will create a tidier image, but will also save your tree from wasting water on more branches.
  • Place your tree in a cool place. Having your tree next to a fireplace or radiator will dry out your plant.
  • Try to use low voltage fairy lights when you decorate your tree. Larger lights will warm up the branches surrounding it and cause water loss.
  • Keep on top of collecting the fallen pine needles. These can be hazardous for infants or pets if swallowed or stuck in the skin!
  • Lastly, you might find using a Christmas tree spray may help to retain moisture in the branches. You could also try spraying hairspray on the underside of the tree, HOWEVER this will make the tree much more flammable so only do this with great  care.

Christmas Tree Decoration

 

If you follow these steps your tree should remain healthy for up to four weeks and be the envy of all your family and friends!

Haven’t bought your Christmas tree yet? Check out our expert advice on how to spot the perfect Christmas tree.

Zoe at PrimroseZoë works in the Marketing team at Primrose, and is passionate about all things social media.

After travelling across Europe and Asia, Zoë is intrigued by different cultures and learning more about the world around her. If she’s not jet setting, Zoë loves nothing more than curling up with a good book and a large glass of red wine!

She is an amateur gardener but keen to learn more and get stuck in!

See all of Zoë’s posts.

Gardening, Geoff, How To

Here at Primrose we like to think of your garden as not just a place chock full of plants and trees, but a place full of expression and character – filled with fine little details that make it simply a great place to be in and explore. Taking this into account and in no particular order, here is a list of 6 of our favourite DIY garden ideas we’ve come across that we think you should definitely try!

Tree Stump PlantersTree Stump Planters

Old tree stump causing a bit of an eye sore? No problem, turn it into a tree stump planter! Save spending money on removing them and simply hollow out a section of the stump, fill it with soil and plant some of your most vibrant and exciting plants. This gives you a wonderful natural looking flower bed without the heavy price that sometimes comes with one. Just be sure to break off some bark and create spaces for drainage at the bottom of the stump to allow for proper growth.

Sail Shade Cinema ScreenOutdoor Cinema

We’ve mentioned this before, but we’re mentioning it again because it is such a fantastic idea. Don’t settle for a big movie night in a cramped living room, check out this customer built outdoor cinema! Most iterations of this idea involve using old PVC piping, weighted buckets and sheets, but we suggest using one of our ever versatile shade sails. If you have the space to manage it, simply hook one up on its side, grab a projector (and of course snacks!) and you are good to go.

Wheel Barrow PlantersWheel Barrow Planter

Revive some life back into an old wheelbarrow and fill it up with soil and plants. Simple as that. Just make sure you have a few small holes for drainage, beware of large holes though or you could end up with flowers across your lawn! Not only does this provide you with a super versatile planter, you can easily move it to anywhere in your garden.

Garden MarkersGarden Markers

If you are particularly arty and need some plant markers, grab some stones from your garden and get painting. These works particularly well when growing your own vegetables are you can get pretty creative with your markers. If you’re feeling brave you could even let your kids loose with the paint and let their imagination run wild.

Coffee GroundsCoffee Grounds

This one isn’t so much a creative ornament or display but a way to recycle something you probably throw out every morning. If like me, you prefer percolated coffee to instant then it turns out you have one of the best and most versatile tools any gardener can have! Sprinkling said coffee grounds on your shrubs and home grown veggies will not only give them a nitrogen boost – promoting better growth – it also doubles as a natural way to deter slugs and ants!

Pallet ShelvingPallet Herb Garden

If you have had a large pallet delivery in the past and don’t know what to do with it, this is a fantastic a rustic way to show off your plants or home grown herbs. Simply remove some of the strips of wood, leaving the top and bottom sections of the pallet. Be sure to use a hammer to remove the nails without damaging them, you’ll need these later. Reattach these pieces of wood at suitable shelving heights and use any remaining strips for front facing and feet. If you are unsure, take a look at the images below for a better step by step idea – but we can assure you, these look fantastic!

Fancy trying your hand at any of these DIY garden ideas? Show us how you get on and send in any pictures to our Facebook or TwitterIf any of these are featured on site, we’ll be sure to send you a £5 voucher!

 

GeoffGeoff works within the Primrose marketing team, primarily on anything related to graphics and design.

He loves to keep up with the latest in music, film and technology whilst also creating his own original art and his ideal afternoon would be lounging in a sunny garden surrounded by good food, drink and company provided there is a football nearby.

While not an expert, his previous job involved landscaping so he’s got some limited experience when gardening.

See all of Geoff’s posts.

Amie, Children in the garden, Gardening, Grow Your Own, How To, Primrose.co.uk

Growing up, my first exposure to gardening was planting sunflower seeds in my grandparent’s back garden and watching them grow taller than me! I used to love getting my hands dirty and playing in the muck of the garden, but it seems a lot of children today would prefer to do the opposite.

Follow these steps to get the kids back into the garden and appreciating the outdoor elements.

1) Plant exciting flowers or varieties
Flowers which don’t require a lot of work or maintenance, such as sunflowers or marigolds are a great starting point for children. Sunflowers grow really tall, which I remember fascinated me. Sensory plants such as Stachys Byzantina (Lamb’s Ears) or Mentha Spicata (Spearmint) will also excite young ones. You can’t go too wrong with seed based plants due to their ease.

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2) Use grown vegetables for dinner
Do you have fussy eater in your household? If so, get them involved with the growing of fresh fruit and vegetables. Carrots, potatoes, tomatoes, the possibilities are endless. It will be rewarding when you sit down for tea and eat all of your hard work too.

Harvesting Summer Vegetables

3) Decorate plant pots
You can easily get some plain pots, which are cheap enough to paint and decorate. This combines creativity with gardening, and then allows for potting and planting afterwards.

How_to_Teach_Children_to_Garden

4) Build a wormery
Most children are fascinated by worms, and why wouldn’t they be? Worms are wonderful little creatures so support their habitation by building a wormery. Simply fill a glass jar or box with moist soil, sand, vegetable peelings, vegetation and leaves, and some worms. You can then look at how they behave, how they move and how they look.

wormery

5) Create a treasure hunt
Children love a treasure hunt, so hide some goodies (perhaps chocolate if you’re feeling generous) in your garden, ensuring they’re hidden well! Bury underneath bushes or hide up trees, and promote the idea of getting mucky and stuck in. It doesn’t matter if your garden is small (or you have no garden), you can go to the park or some wooded area and do this too.

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Show us how they get on, and send in any pictures or stories, especially of worms! If your photo contains a Primrose product and we feature it on site, you will also get a £5 voucher!

  • Email photos@primrose.co.uk
  • Tweet us @PrimroseUK
  • Facebook us @ facebook.com/Primrose.co.uk

We recently had photos sent in from one customer who is helping to educate future gardeners using one of our New Leaf polytunnels!

  

AmieAmie is a marketing enthusiast, having worked at Primrose since graduating from Reading University in 2014.

She enjoys all things sport. A keen football fan, Amie follows Tottenham Hotspur FC, and regularly plays for her local 5 a side football team.

Amie also writes restaurant reviews on  Barnard’s Burger Blog.

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