Flowers, Gardening, Gardens, How To, Liam, Plants, Ponds, Weeding

Water HyacinthWhat to do with pond plants in winter

Pond plants are categorised as hardy or non-hardy which determines how you prepare them for winter, while for some it may be best to throw them away others can be protected and sprout again come spring. Hardy pond plants such as hardy water lilies can be moved to the deeper areas of the pond (at least 18 inches), pruned to the crown and then submerged in the water which will remain warmer than the outside air. For some non-hardy pond plants such as Water Hyacinth or Water Lettuce it may be worth simply to remove them and then replace them come spring. For more expensive non-hardy plants such as tropical Water Lilies you can place them in a tub or bucket and to move them inside to a greenhouse or garage provided the temperature remains above 12°C.

What pond plants survive winter?

Hardy Water Lilies from the Nymphaeaceae family, hardy oxygenators such as Variegated Pennywort or hardy shelf plants such as aquatic Forget-me-nots will all survive winter but how they should be prepared will differ. Depending on the plants preferred growing habitat (i.e deep water, marginal etc) these plants have different methods of preparation if they are to survive through to spring. If the plant is growing in the water, such as Rushes or Iris then you should cut to roughly 20cm above the water line ensuring that the plant does not become submerged otherwise it could drown. Hardy water Lilies or floating plants should be moved to the deepest parts of the pond as the water will stay warmer than the surrounding air. Hardy marginal or moisture loving Perennials should be cut down to as low as 5-10cm.

Water LilyWhat pond plants are the best?

Water Lilies (Nymphaeaceae) are brilliant for adding colour and a subtle beauty to your aquatic space and are among the best plants for your pond. Water forget-me-nots provide a delicate yet bright shade of blue through the summer months and are a pollinators favourite so will be sure to boost the biodiversity in the pond. Hornwort is an essential native oxygenator that will keep ponds of all sizes healthy and clean supporting aquatic life but preventing the growth of weeds and algae. There are a vast number of truly spectacular pond plants, however, depending on what function you want them to serve or what aesthetic you are trying to create some will be wholly better than others.

What pond plants are good for wildlife?

The right pond plants can make your pond a haven for wildlife; oxygenating plants help support aquatic life while floating plants and marginal plants provide shelter and spaces for animals to climb out of the water and rest. Having around 30% of the surface area of your pond covered with plants provides ample shelter while preventing the growth of weeds. Many flowering pond plants are brilliant for attracting bees including Iris stocks and Pontederia.

Pond ReedsWhat pond plants are oxygenators?

Oxygenating pond plants are those which photosynthesis underwater releasing oxygen into the water which can be incredibly beneficial to your pond supporting aquatic life and preventing the growth of weeds and algae. Varieties include Slender Club Rush Scripus cernuus which is an outstanding oxygenating plant for your pond as it retains its luscious shade of green throughout the year with tiny white flowers emerging in the summer. Common Water Starwort – Callitriche autumnalis floats on the surface growing a thick oxygenating layer providing shade and shelter for aquatic life and preventing the growth of weeds.

How to keep the water clear in a pond

The best way to keep your pond water clear is regular maintenance including removing any twigs, leaves or algae from the surface to prevent decay and regularly checking the health and vitality of your pond plants. In addition to this routinely cleaning the ponds water filter and draining your pond annually to clean the bottom and sides will go a long way to keeping your pond clean and looking great.

Water LilyWhat causes pond plants to die?

There are a number of reasons as to why you pond plant may be dying including lack of sunlight, murky or toxic water, planted at an incorrect depth or an incorrect temperature. It is important to always check the specific plant requirements and upkeep a cleaning routine to ensure the health and vitality of the pond. Make sure there is enough space between the plants and none of them are becoming too deprived of light. Remove dead plant matter and this can decay and encourage the growth of weeds which will add competition for nutrients and light. Additionally it may be necessary to check the pH of your pond water if several plants appear to be dying at the same time and to clean the bottom of any toxic sludge that has developed.

Are water lilies poisonous (to cats/dogs)?

Water lilies are not true lilies and are instead a part of the genus Nymphaea and so are not poisonous to cats but still can be poisonous to dogs if ingested in large amounts. It is, however, essential to check which species as the White Water Lily is not poisonous but the Yellow Water Lilies are poisonous. Symptoms of poisoning in cats or dogs includes lethargy, diarrhea, vomiting and depression.

If you are a fan of pond plants  head over to our website where we have many to choose from.

Liam at PrimroseLiam works in the buying team at Primrose. He is passionate about studying other cultures, especially their history. A lover of sports his favourite pass-time is football, either playing or watching it! In the garden Liam is particularly interested in growing your own food.

See all of Liams posts.

Animals, Charlie, How To, Ponds, Wildlife

Last week, we talked you through the building of a pond, from measuring out the area, to digging and laying down the pond liner and filling with water. This week, we’ve got a handy guide to making your pond come alive with aquatic plants and even fish.

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A Guide to Pond Plants

No pond would be complete without some aquatic plants, otherwise it would just be an oversized paddling pool! The good news is that most pond plants require little maintenance, but some thought must be put into what kind of plants you want for your pond, depending on its depth and surface area. Follow this guide and you’re sure to create a beautiful oasis of tranquility at all times of year.

Lillys and other floating plants are great for the ecosystem of any pond. They can prevent algae from forming over the top of your pond as it cuts down on the amount of sunlight entering the water.

As well as floating plants, there are two other key types of pond plant: submerged and marginal. As the name suggests submerged plants are submerged in the water – marginal plants live the the shallow areas on the shelf of your pond and protrude from the water.

It is important to have plenty of submerged plants in your pond as these help oxygenate your pond. Good choices include Callitriche Stagnalis, Marsilea Quadrifolia and Sagittaria Graminea if you want something that flowers. For a smaller pond, it is best not to include varieties that spread too vigorously, and keep the plants in containers rather than allowing them to root down in the sediment.
For marginal plants, Blue Irish, the Chameleon Plant and Brookline are all good choices. Many varieties of marginal and pondside plants are good at attracting wildlife as well as shading and protecting the edges of your pond. Be sure to read the specifications as to what kinds of plants are best for what depth of water.


Fish

Once you’ve filled your pond with vegetation it‘s time to fill the pond with fish. Now fish aren’t necessary for a beautiful pond, in fact for smaller ponds and the miniature pond in a pot it is advisable NOT to stock with fish as the space may be too small, and for larger fish such as coy or carp quite a large pond is required if they are to lead a healthy life. In addition it is best to wait around a month to allow the vegetation to settle before adding your fish. When you do add fish, ensure they’re given enough room to grow and move about – for pond with a surface area of 10m squared, for example, you should really be adding no more than around twenty fish. Obviously, with smaller fish you will be able to add more and with larger fish, less.

In the next installment, we’ll cover the basics of caring for your pond and its inhabitants once it’s set up.

CharlieCharlie works in the Primrose marketing team, mainly on online marketing.

When not writing for the Primrose Blog, Charlie likes nothing more than a good book and a cool cider.

To see the rest of Charlie’s posts, click here.

 

Bulbs, Cat, Flowers, Gardening, Grow Your Own, Planters, Ponds, Primrose.co.uk

Primrose™ Pond in a Pot
One of the new Primrose developments – Pond in a Pot

An online garden retailer based in Reading is seeking to recruit a talented and experienced plants communicator to join our team.

Applicants need to be skilled and well versed with all flora. This is a great opportunity for an enthusiastic individual to join a company expanding their plants inventory. Established 12 years ago, the company is growing yet closely knit with a knowledgeable and friendly team.

Key responsibilities:

  • Able to hold one sided conversations with all types of plants.
  • Able to multitask – we have thousands of plants in stock ranging from spring planting bulbs, hedging and shrubs, bay trees, pond plants, exotic plants and fruit trees.
  • Able to speak using different dialects – some plants respond better to Scottish accents for example.
  • Able to react to changes needed, such as repotting plants into differently coloured planters if they indicate they don’t like the colour. You’ll need to have familiarity with our range of over 1000 planters to match the right pot to the plant.
  • Monitoring the success of the communications through monthly and ad hoc reporting.

Candidates ideally would be:

This is a great opportunity for anyone looking to take their plants knowledge to the next level and develop their career. Full support and on-the-job training provided.

Previous experience not required, but beneficial.

Pay will start at £35,000 – may be negotiable depending on experience

Please send your application or any queries to hello@primrose.co.uk.

Over 2600 Plants & Trees

Cat, Flowers, Gardening, Newsletter

Jersey Plants at Primrose

We’re excited to be teaming up with Jersey Plants Direct, whose beautiful autumn plants are available now on our website, with free delivery!

Perennial Plants mix
Popular Perennial Mix with 24 Jumbo Ready Plants

Summer’s fading light can easily make the colours in our gardens look a bit dull. With our new handpicked Jersey Plants Direct range, blazing autumn colours can easily enrich your garden for one last glorious time this year.

By planting brightly coloured bedding plants, such as wallflowers or pansies, you’ve got your garden’s autumnal needs covered.

Autumnal bedding plants not floating your boat? We have many more plants available on our site, including pond plantsexoticsrosesfruit treesspring bulbs and many more!

Of course there are also our 980+ planters to complement your new flowers!

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

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