Celebrations And Holidays, Christmas, Flowers, Gardening Year, Grow Your Own, Plants

This year we’ve created a collection of Christmas gifts that will fuel a passion for gardening year-round. With over 140 fabulous gifts just a click away this year is all about treating the gardener in your life.  So, if they’re new to the game or an old hat you will find they’ll love. 

 Stocking fillers for everyone

Who doesn’t love a little something in their stocking? These small gifts are perfect little treats to open on Christmas Day.

Winter Warmers 

Keep your feet and hands warm for winter walks or gardening outdoors.

Battery operated heated gloves

£14.99 

Battery heated Socks

£29.00

Battery Heated Insoles

£9.99

Grow Your Own Seed Kits

 Ignite a passion for gardening this year with Plant Theory. Our eco-friendly and easy to grow seed kits are the ideal introduction to growing your own. 

Grow Your own Purple Veg Seed Kit 

£14.99

Grow Your Own Zesty Herb Seed Kit

£19.99

Grow Your Own Chilli Seed Kit

£14.99

 

Thoughtful Gifts For Friends and Family

Know someone who deserves a treat this Christmas? Why not gift them one of our wonderful hampers or Christmas baskets. 

Indulgent Hampers 

 Start as you mean to go on with silky chocolate treats, sweet chutneys and well-bodied wines – the best that Christmas has to offer. 

The Big Christmas Gift Hamper

£99.99

 

The Family Christmas Hamper

£49.99

 Red Wine and Treats Gift Hamper

£57.99

Hampers For Every Diet 

Packed with the tastiest gluten and sugar-free treats, these hampers cater for everyone. 

Gluten-Free Goodies Gift Hamper

£44.99

Diabetic Snacks Gift Hamper

£28.99 

Alcohol-Free Nibbles Gift Hamper

£29.99

Floral Gifts

Show someone you care with the gift of flowers this year.

Gaultheria Christmas Robin

£22.99

Large Christmas Flower Basket

£29.99

Gaultheria Christmas Reindeer

£22.99

Gifts for the garden

Know someone who can’t stay out of the garden? These are the ideal gifts for them.

‘Geisha Purple’ Evergreen Azalea

£17.99

Colour Changing Solar Light

£8.99

Pink Wellie Planter

£29.99

4 Seasons Mini Lemon Tree

£39.99

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Presents for new gardeners

Give your green-fingered friends a great start to their spring and a gift they will love year-round. 

Copper Plated Watering Can

£29.99

Copper Trowel

£33.99

Copper Dibber

£35.99

Decorative Dog Sprinkler

£13.99

Medium Gardening Glove

£13.99

6 Pocket Wall Planter

£11.9

Shop all garden tools 

Gifts for wildlife lovers

february garden birds

A wildlife-friendly garden can attract all sorts of animals from squirrels, rabbits and hedgehogs. Encourage these furry friends into the garden with houses and feeders so you can enjoy watching their antics year-round.

Birds 

Our fantastic bird care gifts bring life into your garden and help our feathered friends raise healthy chicks and thrive throughout the year. 

Small Bird Gift Box

£27.99

Natural Log Nesting Box

£25.99

Cottage Bird House

£29.99

 

Copper Peanut Feeder

£24.99

Cottage Bird House

£29.99

Copper Seed Feeder

£24.99

Shop all bird care

Hedgehogs

Give Hedgehogs a space to hibernate and shelter from harsh weather with a hog house.

Hedgehog House Care Pack 

£37.99

Wooden Hogitat

£63.99

Shop all hedgehog homes

Bees

These little pollinators are great for keeping your garden in good health, but their numbers have been in decline in recent years. Our nesting houses and conservation kits help to keep your garden lively by helping bees thrive. 

Bumblebee Nester

£44.99

Bee Care Gift Set

£49.99

Bee Nesting House 

£18.99

View all bee care

 Gifts for houseplant lovers

 

Houseplants bring life and colour to a home. They lift the mood, purify the air and create a calm atmosphere. Know someone who adores houseplants or who could do with a few more? Then our houseplant collection is a good place to start. 

For the lounge or dining room

These plants love light, need little care, and pack a visual punch.

Dieffenbachia ‘Reflector’

£14.99

Fatsia Japonica 

£29.99

Philodendron Scandens

£13.99

Satin Pothos 

£14.99

Calathea ‘Ornata’

£29.99

Bonsai Tea Tree in Buddha Pot

£20.00

Kitchen & bathroom

These tropical plants love humidity and bring bold colour and fascinating shapes into your kitchen or bathroom. 

Tropical Pitcher Plant

£29.99

Croton Colour Collection 

£14.99

Fern Starter Collection

£14.99

Ficus lyrata

£79.99

Croton ‘Pictum’

£5.99

Brake Fern

£5.99

For more great gift ideas visit our complete gift collection.

 

Allotment, Composting, Gardening, Gardening Year, Gardens, Grow Your Own, Planting

Autumn is a season of transition. As the warm bright days of summer begin to shorten and grow colder, your crops near their end and it’s time to start preparing for winter and planting for spring. There is a lot to do at this time of the year, but with our list of jobs to do this season, you will find yourself well prepared. 

General Maintainance 

raking leaves

  • Collect fallen leaves– keep your garden looking tidy and reduce the chances of pests and diseases in your garden
  • Create a compost heap –  fallen leaves and dead plant material can make great compost that will be good for plants in spring. Think about creating your heap in a quiet corner of your garden or in a compost bin
  • Repair or replace fencing – now that your plants are dormant and the ground is still warm enough to dig in it’s a great time to replace damaged or old fencing
  • Insulate outdoor taps – frozen taps can become damaged. Wrap in kitchen foil of fleece to protect it from the coldest weather
  • Prepare the lawn for winter – continue to mow the lawn if the frost is not too heavy, but raise the height of the mower blades; spike with a garden fork to improve drainage
  • Organise your shed-  take the time to clear out your garden shed, check security, and organise and clean your tools ready for spring. 
  • Prune the garden– prune fruit trees, dormant shrubs and hedges, roses, and Japanese maples in order to ensure a good start to spring
  • Cluster container plants together– as their roots are more exposed to the elements, move shrubs and bedding plants growing in containers to sheltered spots and cluster together for protection from the colder weather
  • Check tree ties– check any tree ties to make sure trees are protected from strong winds and the tree stems will not be damaged by ties that are too tight; 
  • Make Leaf Mould – bag up fallen leaves in a good quality bin bag. Poke holes in the bag and leave out of sight for two years. Leaf mould  can be used as seed-sowing compost or used to enrich the soil
  • Clear the remains of summer crops – to avoid them rotting and attracting pests and diseases
  • Clean Your Tools – taking good care of your tools now will prevent them from rusting over winter and needing to be replaced in the summer
  • Prune fruit bushes –  prune out any dead, dying or diseased wood whilst your fruit trees are dormant to encourage new and good growth in the spring
  • Net brassicas – to protect them from overwintering birds. Use a fine mesh or a frame that it lifts clear of the plant to stop birds pecking through. You could also consider a polytunnel or cold frame
  • Begin Digging Over – dig small sections of your garden over the month to get manure, air and compost into the soil. 

Plants 

 

  • Protect plants from the frost– standard terracotta planters often break in cold weather, so consider our frost-resistant fibrecotta. For plants in flower beds, a cold frame or cloche fleece provides instant protection
  • Raise plant containers– raise pots off the ground for the winter using bricks or pot feet to prevent them from becoming waterlogged
  • Prune rose bushes- prevent wind rock (swaying in the wind and the roots becoming loose) by pruning roses by one third to half their height
  • Cut back herbaceous perennials– cut back the yellowing foliage of any flowering plants, then life and divide any overcrowded clumps
  • Plant tulip bulbstulip bulbs to bloom in spring next year are best planted in late autumn to prevent the tulip fire disease
  • Move dormant plants– if you need to relocate any plants or fruit trees, now is the time to do so while they are dormant
  • Plant spring bulbs– plant bulbs such as daffodils, crocus, hyacinths, and fritillaries before the first frost to fill your garden with colour in th spring
  • Take hardwood cuttings– cut healthy shoots from suitable trees, shrubs, and climbers, including honeysuckle and blackcurrant shrubs. plant in the ground or in a pot to propagate new plants
  • Lift and store dahlia tubers– these tender perennials need protection from the colder weather, so lift the dormant roots and stems to store indoors and plant back outside next spring

Greenhouse 

 

  • Stock up on greenhouse accessories– now you’ll be spending more time in your greenhouse, make sure to stock up on accessories, including a heater to maintain the temperature and staging to hold your plants
  • Sow winter herbs– sow Mediterranean herbs such as thyme, sage, and parsley for a fresh supply during the winter
  • Clean your greenhouse– if you haven’t already done so, make sure to clean your greenhouse thoroughly; wash and disinfect capillary matting before storing away
  • Water plants sparingly– make sure plants are hydrated but keep the greenhouse as dry as possible to reduce the risk of disease
  • Combat pests– check overwintering plants for pests such as aphids and red spider mite, treat if necessary using a general insecticide
  • Maintain plants– pick faded leaves and dead flowers from plants that are being stored in the greenhouse over the winter
  • Check that all heaters are working properly –  You will need them in the coming months, so check them now so you don’t have to rush and buy new ones when they are needed. If any are broken replace them now
  • Remove snow– make sure to brush any snow off the top of greenhouses and cold frames to make sure the glass does not get damaged

 

 

Gardening Year

We are now in the depths of Autumn, by now tress would have started to drop their leaves, and temperatures are starting to drop fast. This month is all about starting to get your final prep for winter started. 

Garden Weeds

General

  •  Rake fallen leaves –  clear lawns, borders, driveways and paths, and store in  bin bags to rot down into leafmould
  • Do a final check on your shed –  check that it’s secure and waterproof, so you can safely store tools and patio furniture over the  winter
  • Apply an autumn lawn feed –   revive grass after summer and harden it for winter
  • Empty ceramic and glazed pots –  these aren’t frost-proof so empty and store in a shed over winter
  • Spike compacted lawns – brush grit into the holes to improve drainage
  • Pack up hoses and drip-feed systems  –  and store indoors over winter, so they don’t freeze and split
  • Gather up canes and plant supports that are no longer in use –  store indoors over winter ready for use in the spring

Plants 

  • Plant drifts of spring bulbs – informally plant  crocuses, daffodils and snake-head fritillaries to get a good early start once spring comes
  • Lift tender plants – protect them from any early frosts 
  • Plant winter container plants – heathers, cyclamen, winter pansies and skimmia should be planted now for a full growing season 
  • Lift and pot up tender perennials –  chocolate cosmos, gazanias and coleus in particular  benefit this  to protect them over winter
  • Plant evergreen shrubs and conifer hedges – this may be the last chance to do so whilst the soil is still warm 
  • Put plant pots on feet – remove any pot saucers and raise pots up onto feet to prevent waterlogging over winter
  • Wrap fleece around tree ferns – it will soon become too cold for them so get this done as soon as you can 
  • Empty summer pots and hanging baskets – compost and have some good growing medium in spring

Wildlife

  • Build a log pile – put near the borders of your garden to give  wildlife shelter for the winter
  • Clean out and disinfect bird boxes – to keep them clean and ready for winter guests
  • Keep an eye out for snail nests – they like to overwinter in damp spaces so keep an eye out for them

 

Allotment, Gardening, Gardening Year, Gary, Grow Your Own

September is the month to enjoy the fruits if your labours.  A lot of your product will be ready to harvest this month, but it’s also time to start thinking about preparing for the frost and planning for next year. 

General

  • Complete pruning of soft fruit bushes –  apple and pear trees, in particular, will benefit from this
  •  Sow green manure, such as grazing rye – suppresses weeds over the winter
  • Feed all late crops with a general fertiliser – do this now for great crops when the time comes 
  • Dig up and compost any plants that have finished their season – ensure you have great soil for next years planting
  • Cut back old canes of blackberries – do this after fruiting and tie in the new canes

Harvesting

  • Beetroot
  • Cabbage
  • Carrots
  • Cauliflowers
  • Courgettes
  • Globe Artichokes
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Lettuce
  • Leeks
  • Marrows
  • medlars
  • Onions
  • Pumpkins
  • Radishes
  • Spring Onions
  • quince
  • Spinach
  • Sweetcorn
  • Turnips

Sowing 

  • Alfalfa 
  • Beansprouts 
  • Broccoli 
  • Cauliflower
  • Fenugreek 
  • Radish
  • Red onion
  • Spinach 
  • Spring cabbage 
  • Crimson clover and Italian ryegrass – they act as ground cover during the winter. When dug in, they conserve nutrients and improve soil texture.

Pests and Diseases 

  • Watch tomatoes for blossom end rot, and other ripening problems. These are usually caused by irregular watering
  • Wasps are attracted this time of year due to the ripening of your fruit. protect any grapes or fruit from wasps with netting or mesh.