Awnings, Garden Design, Outdoor Living, Scott

Welcome to our ultimate guide to awnings. Read on for some great advice on choosing an awning, installation and set up as well as cleaning tips.

Awning for shade

What is an awning?

In its simplest form, an awning is a sheet of canvas or other material that is stretched across a frame to provide shade from the sun or protection from the rain. 

How can I benefit from an awning?

A garden awning can increase the comfort levels of a seating area by making it a location suited to all weathers. It can shield you from harsh sunlight but also keep you dry in the rain, allowing you to extend the time spent outside. 

You can also transform your planting options by introducing more shade. Shade-loving plants like ferns become a viable option when you can easily block out the strong midday sun. 

What types of awning are there?

By our simple definition, an awning could be interpreted as anything that provides shade or shelter on a frame; this could include gazebos, marquees and shade sails. For this guide, however, we’re going to be talking about mounted patio awnings. This is typically what we think of when we say an awning and is the variety you may often associate with shop windows, cafes and coffee houses. 

What kinds of mounted awning are there?

There are a lot of things you can consider when selecting a mounted awning. Size, material, special qualities like waterproof material of extra UV protection but the first way we categorise our awnings is how they retract.

Full cassette -this means that when the awning is retracted, all of the material will be concealed in the cassette case.

Half cassette – this means that when the awning is retracted, only the back of the sheet will be concealed in the cassette case.

Standard – this means that the awning will simply roll up on retraction, without being held in a cassette case. 

Primrose Awnings Certified Shop

How do I fit a mounted awning?

The preparation for installing an awning can usually be completed by one person. You will, however, require assistance when lifting the awning into position. 

You can install most of our standard awnings by following the basic instructions below. For specific instructions, you can find the required PDfs here: https://www.primrose-awnings.co.uk/instructions.php

Required equipment:

  • Step ladder
  • Tape measure
  • Drill
  • Pencil or sharpie for marking the wall
  • Screwdriver (optional for starting screws off)

Basic installation guide:

  1. Determine the position of your awning on the wall. It’s best to position it between 8 and 11 feet off the ground. Bear in mind that the awning will extend out at a diagonal so the furthest end will be lower than the starting height.
  2. Measuring out the awning and mark the position on your wall for where the brackets will be positioned.
  3. Drill holes for fixing your brackets to the wall. Be sure to drill into brick and not the mortar as this will be too weak. Most awnings will only need 8 holes to be drilled with 4 on each side (large awnings may require more holes to be drilled)
  4. Attach your wall brackets.
  5. Lift the main awning into position and fix to the bracket. This is the step you should never attempt on your own and is best done with assistance. 
  6. Slowly extend the awning out to ensure everything operates correctly. 
  7. Enjoy your awning!

How do I clean an awning?

Washing Awning

Extending your awning when it’s raining will do a lot of the hard work for you but it’s good to give a regular clean once every 6 months or so. This will keep it looking fresh and new but will also help prolong its lifespan. With a step ladder you can clean your awning in 4 easy steps:

  1. Use a long-handled broom or brush to remove any debris from the awning fabric.
  2. Use a simple solution of washing up liquid and water in a spray bottle to lightly soak your awning fabric and brush with a soft brush.
  3. Rinse off with a hose and leave the awning extended to dry naturally in the air.
  4. Use a cloth and some of the liquid solution to clean the cassette casing. 

Do awnings need planning permission?

Residential properties generally do not require planning permission to install an awning. Commercial properties such as cafes and shops will usually need permission, however.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this ultimate guide to all things awning!

 

 

Garden Design, Gardening, Gardening & Landscaping, Gardens, How To, Scott, Wildlife

A garden pond is one of the best things you can create to encourage all sorts of animals into the garden. It will act as both habitat and water source to a variety of wildlife such as dragonflies, frogs and all sorts of birds. This guide will equip you with the knowledge to make a wildlife-friendly pond in your garden with minimal materials. 

Be sure to share how you go on with building your own pond over on the Primrose Instagram.

garden pond with water lillies

Tools & Materials:

  • Pond liner
  • String and pegs or stakes
  • Sharp knife
  • A long plank of wood
  • Spirit level
  • Garden spade
  • Bags of sand
  • Some large rocks

Method:

Locate Your Pond

  1. Identify the best spot for your pond. The ideal would be a spot that gets plenty of sun during the day and a little shade in the evening. If you can, avoid any overhanging trees as falling leaves can pollute the pond water.
  2. Mark out the edge of your pond with the string and pegs. Play around with different shapes and sizes until you’re happy. 

Dig Your Pond

  1. Start digging. If you dig from the middle and work out you can adjust the shape as it develops. Things can look very different in perspective once a piece of lawn suddenly become a large hole. You don’t have to dig very deep; a shallow pond will still be very beneficial for wildlife. 
  2. Pile soil to one side of your pond to create a gradual slope. This will allow wildlife to access the water easily and get out of the water should anything accidentally fall in. 
  3. Once you’re happy with the size and shape, rest your plank of wood across the pond and use your spirit level to check both sides are even. Repeat several times at different angles. This step is very important. Having a pond that is higher on a certain edge could lead to water flooding out of the pond in heavy rain. Spend time making sure this part is as perfect as you can get it.
  4. Remove any sharp objects or stones from the bottom of the hole to avoid ripping the lining before covering the bottom of your pond with sand. A small layer of a few cm’s will do to offer a layer of protection for the liner.
  5. Dig a small trench around the edge of the pond for the excess liner to be tucked into. This will help give everything a clean finish.

Line Your Pond

  1. Place the liner into the hole ensuring it covers the entire surface. Take time to remove as many creases as you possible can pushing the liner into the surface of the soil so it fits the shape of the hole as close as possible. 
  2. Tuck the edge of the liner into your trench and weigh it down with rocks, removing any excess liner with a sharp knife.
  3. Use any remaining sand to create a small layer of sand in the base of your pond.

Fill Your Pond

  1. Fill your pond with water! Try to use collected rainwater if possible as this will be packed full of nutrients that are perfect for kickstarting wildlife. To stop the water from disturbing the sand you can empty it onto a surface like a plastic bag so that the force is spread out a little more.
  2. Once filled you can add your choice of aquatic plants; wildlife will soon flock to your new pond!

Scott at PrimroseScott Roberts is a copywriter currently making content for the Primrose site and blog. When at his desk he’s thinking of new ways to describe a garden bench. Away from his desk he’s either looking at photos of dogs or worrying about the environment. He does nothing else, just those two things.

See all of Scott’s posts.

 

Alice, Garden Design, Gardens

While flowerbeds and borders are great places to create a dazzling display, pots have the benefits of adding flexibility, variety, and a sense of staging. A potted garden can be a wonderful place to spend time, but if you’re stuck for ideas to get started, here are some design ideas for potted gardens.

design ideas for potted gardens

Pocketed Plants

If you’re short of space, plant pockets are the perfect compact solution. Our Living Wall Felt Planter hangs easily against a wall, fence, or balcony, and provides 6 small pockets that make great homes for small plants or herbs. You can also create your own using an over-the-door shoe organiser!

Plant Ladder

A plant ladder is an eye-catching addition to any garden or terrace and offers plenty of space for small plants. Our Outdoor Wooden Triangular Ladder offers three shelves to display items and add levels to your garden. You can also upcycle an old ladder with a fresh coat of paint.

Wall Planter

A wall planter is a fantastic space-saving solution if you have a smaller garden, and can be a great way to brighten up a boring wall. Our Rusted Metal Vase Wall Planter adds style and character to your garden with rustic Greek-style urns.

Wellington Boots

Wellington boots make a unique way to display trailing plants. Our Pair Of Wellington Boots Planters have a rusted weathered finish and look amazing filled with tumbling plants. You can also upcycle an old pair of wellington boots for an eye-catching addition to your garden or patio.

Climbing Plants

No longer restricted to the ground, potted plants can be used to liven up a plain wall with lush greenery. Our Trough With Trellis Hardwood Planter provides a planting area with a wooden trellis for plants to climb up. Fill with beautiful climbing roses or clematis for a glorious display.

Parallel Planters

Jumbo-sized planters packed with plants are a great way to provide screens of green. Placing them in parallel rows is a great way to create a walkway or secluded area. The classic look of The Big One Terracotta Pot Planter makes an impressive and stylish addition to your garden.

Wishing Well

A wishing well planter makes an attractive focal point for a patio or area of your garden and is a great way to house a range of plants. Our Large Wishing Well Wooden Planter is made from Swedish timber using sustainable resources and can be built in under half an hour.

Water Feature

A water feature planter serves the dual purpose of housing greenery while adding the ambient sound of gently flowing water to your outdoor space. It can also make a fantastic focal point. The Easter Island Solar Head Water Feature makes a stunning but natural-looking addition to your garden and comes with LED lights so you can enjoy it after dark.

Now you’ve got your design ideas for potted gardens, make sure to check out our guide to how to plant in pots to get growing!

What have you been up to in your potted garden? Let us know on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

Decoration, Decorative Features, Garden Design, Garden Furniture, Gardens, Outdoor Living, Scott

Is your garden a space you haven’t had the time to really enjoy before? Perhaps this is the first time you’re wondering how to make outdoor space work for you and your family. Below we have a basic guide to garden furniture for anyone looking to get started with creating a living space outside for the first time.

Finding A Use For Space

The first thing to think about is how your space will be used. Don’t be put off by thinking your garden is too small.  A lot can be done to make a nice spot to relax, dine, play or grow. If you want to be eating outside with the family, for example, invest in a good dining set and some cover like a gazebo or parasol. If space is limited maybe consider a bistro set? You could be enjoying breakfast and coffee surrounded by plants taking in the morning sun; a good start to the day for most of us!

Garden Furniture

Bigger gardens can have multiple functions sitting alongside one another. For smaller spaces, it’s best to pick one main function and create your design around this. Start with the primary function of the space and invest in something that will deliver just that.

Details That Make It Your Own

Look at the rooms that fill your home. What are your favourite things about them? What bits spark happy memories or facilitate something you love doing? Is it a comfy chair in the corner of the living room where you love to settle down with a book? Maybe the crate full of games you dive into with the kids each weekend? Or the kitchen table where you serve up dishes to family and friends?

Garden furniture

Think about the items of furniture which allow these moments of happiness and how they can translate outside. You could create a reading nook for warm summer evenings filled with weather-resistant cushions, or a play area dedicated to mayhem filled games with the kids, or maybe a fire pit where you can take your cooking in new directions. Find the items that will transform your outdoor space into an extension of your home.

Decorative Flair

Final aesthetic details can really make a space feel special and this doesn’t need to be anything expensive. A simple set of solar-powered fairy lights are cheap, hassle-free and can add a new layer of interest. So when looking for accessories for your outdoors try to keep in mind the temperamental weather and shop for items that are weather resistant. Items that can stay outside year-round or quickly packed away are ideal and will make life outside that much easier.

Garden furniture

There are so many things you can add to help inject your personality into your space and make it special to your purpose. Mirrors, lights, wall art, water features, screening and garden ornaments are all things you can consider when setting up outdoor space. When picking anything out, think back to the original function you identified and think about how this accessory elevates that experience.

I hope this quick guide has got you thinking about your outdoor space. Continue to explore the blog for more resources on getting the most from your outdoor space.

Scott at PrimroseScott Roberts is a copywriter currently making content for the Primrose site and blog. When at his desk he’s thinking of new ways to describe a garden bench. Away from his desk he’s either looking at photos of dogs or worrying about the environment. He does nothing else, just those two things.

See all of Scott’s posts.