Bulbs, How To, Jorge, Planting, Plants

To plant bulbs successfully, it’s important to plant at the right time and depth with the bulb the right way up. You can ensure showstopper blooms by fertilising when planting, and as long as there is vegetative growth in the growing season. Applying mulch in winter will help protect spring-flowering bulbs from frost injury. 

When To Plant

If ordering online, plant as soon as you receive the bulb, or store in a dry, dark location if you can’t plant immediately. Leave a bulb unplanted and it may fail to flower or flower poorly. If you forget to plant, examine by touch, and discard soft or rotten bulbs. Others are worth a shot. 

Generally, spring flowering bulbs need to be planted by the end of September, which will allow time for the bulb to root before the ground freezes. Tulips are planted in October and November, depending on whether you are in the North or South respectively, which helps reduce problems with disease. 

Hardy summer flowering bulbs are to be planted in September and October, while tender summer flowering bulbs in early spring. Autumn flowering bulbs need to be planted by late summer. 

BulbSeasonPlanting depthPlanting distance between bulbsPosition
AlliumAutumn10cm (4″)10cm (4″)Full sun
BegoniaSpring1cm (1/2″)30cm (12″)Full sun, semi shade, dappled shade
CrocusAutumn10cm (4″)7cm (3″)Full sun, semi shade
DaffodilAutumn10cm (4″)10cm (4″)Full sun, semi shade
DahliaSpring15cm (6″)45cm (18″)Full sun
BluebellSpring/Autumn10cm (4″)10cm (4″)Dappled shade
GladiolusSpring10cm (4″)15cm (6″)Full sun
HyacinthAutumn10cm (4″)8cm (3″)Full sun, semi shade
Iris reticulataAutumn10cm (4″)8cm (3″)Full sun
LilyAutumn20cm (8″)15cm (6″)Full sun, semi shade
NarcissusAutumn10cm (4″)10cm (4″)Full sun, semi shade
PonerorchisSpring2.5cm (1″)7cm (3″)Dappled shade
RanunculusAutumn8cm (3″)25cm (10″)Full sun
SnowdropSpring/Autumn10cm (4″)10cm (4″)Dappled shade
Tree LilyAutumn20cm (8″)15cm (6″)Full sun, semi shade
TulipAutumn15cm (6″)13cm (5″)Full sun
White Egret OrchidSpring2.5cm (1″)7cm (3″)Dappled shade
Winter AconiteAutumn5cm (2″)5cm (2″)Full sun, semi shade, dappled shade

Position 

As always it’s best to look at a species habitat and flowering time when deciding where to plant. Early spring bulbs such as snowdrops are used to harsh conditions, and will thrive in cold pockets. Forest dwelling species such as the bluebell are used to dappled shade, and will thrive under any deciduous tree. More exotic species such as dahlia, originating from Mexico, are suited to full sun. 

It’s not the end of the world if you plant in a sub-optimal location as bulbs are a storage organ and the plant already has a large reserve of energy. Bulbs rarely thrive in deep shade and output will be poor in the second year after planting. 

It’s possible that southern exposure can lead to early emergence and freezing injury. You can moderate temperature extremes by applying 3 inches of mulch after the first frost. This will help prevent injury from the constant cycle of frost and thaw. Remove the mulch if you think the shoots can’t penetrate it easily. 

Mulch will help protect bulbs from frost injury.

Soil Type

The key message is to avoid waterlogged soils, which can starve a bulb of oxygen, causing them to rot. Clay soils usually have poor drainage, and can be improved by adding organic mulch. Ensure you don’t compact the soil, but firm with the back of a rake. 

Right-side Up 

Most bulbs have a tip, which should be pointing upwards when planted. Some will arrive with roots on the bottom, opposite to the tip. Begonia bulbs do not have a sharp point, but you can sometimes detect the tip emerging out of the concave (indented) side.

Planting Depth & Distance

A general rule of thumb is that bulbs can be planted three times their height, although begonias are an exception to this. 

Bulbs in containers can be spaced a bulb width apart. In the ground, 2-4 inches is common for small and 8 inches for large bulbs. 

Apply phosphorus when planting as it doesn’t travel well in the soil. This essential nutrient helps with root growth. 

Aftercare

Water immediately after planting, unless you are planting in autumn and the ground is already wet. 

Sometimes, small mammals will dig up bulbs, but this can be prevented with wire mesh. 

Plants in containers are vulnerable to drought and under fertilisation, so water and feed regularly once the growing season starts. 

As nutrients are absorbed through roots, it’s important nutrients reach the depth the roots are located. Liquid fertiliser will penetrate the soil, and can remedy deficiencies quickly, but is liable to leeching. Other inorganic fertilisers will fertilise the soil over time, so need to be applied in advance. Organic fertiliser takes far longer as it’s insoluble and first needs to be broken down by microorganisms, before becoming available for uptake by plants. 

Removing seed pods, but maintaining foliage, allows a plant to put more energy into its bulb, for larger blooms thereafter. Watering and feeding will help with this. Remove foliage once it yellows. 

After this, bulbs can be lifted, sorted, washed, left to dry and then stored in a cool, dry, airy place. Small, rotten or diseased bulbs are best thrown. 

Jorge at PrimroseJorge works in the Primrose marketing team. He is an avid reader, although struggles to stick to one topic!

His ideal afternoon would involve a long walk, before settling down for scones.

Jorge is a journeyman gardener with experience in growing crops.

See all of Jorge’s posts.

Bulbs, Composting, Gardening, Guest Posts, How To, Planting

The cold winter weather is fast approaching. For gardening enthusiasts, this means that it will soon be time to put your hoses and tools away until the growing season returns next spring. However, your gardening tasks aren’t quite done for the year yet, as you still need to ensure that your beds and plants are prepared to handle the freezing temperatures. Preparing your garden in the autumn also helps to ensure healthy, more vigorous growth next year. With this in mind, we’ll now take a look at four simple steps to ensure your garden is ready for winter.

pruning shears

1. Shield Perennials and Bulbs from the Cold

Annual plants can simply be pulled up and tossed in the compost pile when they die. However, any perennials and bulb plants may need a bit of extra protection to keep them alive through the winter.

Before the first frost arrives, it is best to start cutting back on how much you water any perennials to help harden them up and better prepare them for winter. Once the plants have finished for the year, it is also a good idea to trim back the stems so that they’re only about 6 to 8 inches high. Doing so will help to shield the plants from the cold and also allow them to grow more vigorously when the warm weather arrives.

Any bulb plants that flower in the early spring can usually be left in the ground throughout the winter. However, any bulbs that flower in the summer should be dug up and stored inside to prevent them from being damaged by the cold. This includes freesias, elephant’s ears, cannas, calla lilies and other later-blooming flowers.

After gently digging the bulbs up, shake off any excess dirt and then allow the bulbs to dry in the sun for approximately a week. Finally, store them in a cardboard box surrounded by plenty of peat, sawdust or newspaper so that none of the bulbs are touching.

bulbs

2. Consider Some Last-Minute Planting

Autumn is the ideal time to plant any early-flowering bulbs such as tulips, daffodil, iris, etc. In fact, the only way to ensure that your bulb flowers will bloom in the spring is to plant them in the early autumn before the ground freezes. Most early-flowering bulbs need to freeze during the winter in order to grow in the autumn. This means they need to either be in the ground or stored in a freezer.

Many varieties of perennials also work well when planted in the winter due to the drier ground and lower temperatures. If you’re growing a vegetable garden, planting onions and garlic during the autumn allows them to be harvested several months earlier the following year.

adding compost

3. Compost Garden and Flower Beds

Adding compost during the autumn helps to provide additional nutrients to your plants the next spring. Composting during the autumn allows the nutrients more time to break down and infiltrate deeper into the soil, which in turn provides better growing conditions the following season. Generally speaking, you should spread a thin layer of compost over the top of the soil, and then work the compost deeper into the ground sometime around or just after the first freeze.

mulch

4. Use Mulch to Protect Your Top Soil

Another good idea is to spread a layer of mulch or dead leaves before the first freeze. Adding a layer of mulch on top of your beds helps to protect any plants left in the ground from the freezing temperatures. In addition, the mulch will also help to prevent rain, snow and ice from washing away your top soil or leeching out its nutrients. However, the layer of mulch shouldn’t be much more than three to four inches thick as otherwise it could choke out your plants and make it harder for them to bloom in the spring.

If you are lucky enough to live in a fairly warm climate with milder winters, you probably won’t have to do much to prepare your garden. However, if you live in a place where it frequently freezes or where there is a lot of winter precipitation, it is essential that you take the proper steps to your garden. Winter can wreak havoc on your garden if you’re not careful, so it’s important that you do what you can to protect it.

Victoria GiangVictoria is a home working mom and the author of How Daily, a blog that shares her taste and experience on food, recipes, home & garden projects. These are ranging widely from quick cleaning of household appliance to planting and caring for garden favorites.

Allotment, Bulbs, Charlie, Composting, Flowers, Gardening, Grow Your Own, How To, Planting

Compost – a gardener’s friend, a great way to give a boost to all your plants, from seedlings to mature shrubs and trees – but which compost is the best for the job? We take a look at the things to keep an eye out for when buying your compost.


fresh-soil-1468423

Q) What do you call an irishman lying at the bottom of a bog for 1000 years?
A) Peat!

Since the 1970s, most composts use peat as a central ingredient. Peat is great for compost as, being made up of decayed vegetation, it contains in abundance many of the nitrates needed to help plants grow. However there are environmental drawbacks – namely the destruction of huge areas of natural wilderness owing to the harvesting of peat. While most of the peat used in the UK is imported, the amount of peat used from UK sources still far outstrips the rate at which it is naturally produced.

Thankfully, there are now on the market many peat-reduced or peat-free alternatives to the regular types of compost, many of which are just as effective as helping your plants grow. Generally made out of coir, wood fibre and composted bark, which mean they are good at holding water, but are also well drained. At Primrose, we only stock peat-free compost.

As well as the peat content, another thing to keep an eye on is the acidity. Composts that are too alkaline or too acidic can be damaging to many plants, while some plants do thrive in acidic soil conditions this is not the case for most. An ideal pH is around 7, but due to the salts containing the nutrients plants need to thrive,most composts will be a bit off from this. Too low and it can spell disaster for plants.

Drainage/ Water Retention. How well a compost drains and contains water is also important. If a compost has poor drainage it can lead to waterlogged root, on the other hand, if a compost has poor water retention, it can lead to there being not enough moisture for the plants to really thrive.

Fertiliser Levels. How much fertiliser is in the compost will naturally affect how well a plant grows. What might be less apparent however is that too much fertiliser can also be a bad thing, as well as too little. Too much fertiliser is not needed by many plants, and putting too much in can cause the soil’s pH to fall to dangerous levels.

We at Primrose hope this helps you make a more informed choice, and buy the best compost for your plants and the wider environment, as long as you buy from us!

 

compost

 

CharlieCharlie works in the Primrose marketing team, mainly on online marketing.
When not writing for the Primrose Blog, Charlie likes nothing more than a good book and a cool cider.

To see the rest of Charlie’s posts, click here.

Bulbs, Flowers, Gardening, Gardening Year, Greenhouses, Grow Your Own, Guest Posts, Herbs, How To, Planters, Planting, Plants

Often once it gets cold outside we stop gardening because it’s difficult to grow plants outside when the temperatures are low and the ground has frozen. Luckily you don’t need to just throw away gardening because you cannot do it outside, you can start an indoor garden and continue to get your gardening fix even in the dead of winter.

How to Grow Plants Indoors
Indoor gardening by definition is growing plants inside, whether it be in your house, some other building, a greenhouse, your basement or any other sheltered structure. This method of gardening usually is used to not only start plants earlier in the spring or extend their growth in the autumn, but also to grow your plants during the winter too. But any old indoor garden won’t do if you want to grow big, healthy plants, so that’s why I will give you some tips how to more successfully create and use an indoor garden.

1. Decide on the best place for your indoor garden

When you are thinking about setting up an indoor garden first you really need to think about where your garden will be. If you plan on creating the garden in your basement or in your garage you might want to think about some additional lighting for your garden. However if you situate your indoor garden in a room where there are big windows and plenty of light, or even set-up the garden on your windowsill, then you can get away with just the light that comes through the windows. Also when you’re choosing a place, think about how warm the room will be once the temperatures drop and how humid it will be in your planned indoor garden grow room, as too cold or too humid an environment will only stunt the growth of your plants.

2. Think about the growing medium of your indoor garden

Another important thing to think about once you have decided on where you will place your garden is in what growing medium you will plant your plants. You shouldn’t use soil found outside as it often is filled with different pests and weeds and doesn’t contain enough minerals to sustain the plants once they are indoors. That is why I recommend to either buy some kind of special potting soil or give your plants plenty of additional minerals, if you decide on using soil from outdoors.

3. Don’t forget to check on the plants regularly

When you are gardening outdoors often the plants get the minerals, the light and water they need from nature, but indoor gardening is a whole new ball game. You cannot forget to regularly check on your plants and see if they need more water, light or food (fertiliser). Often plants in different growing stages and in different conditions require different care so make sure that you keep up with what your plants need.

Quick tip: If you don’t want any pests to settle on your plants, rinse them under flowing water at least once a week, so the plant foliage is clean and you don’t have to use any pest control products to treat the plants.

4. Chose the right plants for your indoor garden

It is true that you can grow indoors virtually any plant as long as these plants don’t get too tall, as indoors you don’t have unlimited height. But there are certain plants that will grow better indoors. Plants that will thrive indoors are the ones that like warm environments and can grow even if there isn’t constant sunlight shining on them. For example tomatoes, beans, peas, any herbs like rosemary or peppermint, fruits like strawberries and grapes, and most flowers will be perfect for indoor growth. But this doesn’t mean that you cannot grow other plants in your indoor garden too. Just try it and if it doesn’t work out move on to next type of plant, because the beauty of gardening is trial and error and doing everything you possibly can to help your plants grow.

Benjamin ThortonBen Thorton is the owner and main editor of a website called www.t5fixtures.com. He is an avid gardening enthusiast and has many years of experience gardening indoors.