Decorative Features, Water Features

Indoor water features are a design element that a lot of people overlook. They add movement and sound into a space and can be used as a centrepiece or accent feature. In Feng Shui, indoor fountains are thought to bring peace, tranquillity and well-being into the home and universities have started to research the benefits themselves. So, how can an indoor fountain improve health? Read on to find out. 

They Improve Sleep 

The sounds of running water can be found on most sleep and relaxation soundtracks because they work. Being around nature is a great way to reset your body clock and promote good sleeping patterns, but nothing can beat the real thing. Any indoor water feature will bring the calming repetitive sounds of running water into the home and give you some relaxing background sounds. 

Why it’s important: making sure you get enough sleep is one of the most important things you can do for good mental and physical health

They Relieve Stress 

A study by the University of Sussex found that the sounds of nature can drastically lower stress levels. If you live in an urban area or don’t have access to many outdoor spaces during the week, then a water feature in the home is an ideal way to bring the outside in. 

Why it’s important: prolonged levels of stress can cause issues with your mental and physical health and can lead to burnout id not treated. 

They Humidify The Air 

It’s common in winter for the air in your home to begin to dry out when the heating is on all day. As a water feature runs it releases water vapour into the air that improves the humidity and creates a calming atmosphere in the home that is good for health and wellbeing. 

Why it’s important: dry air can cause problems to your throat and nose which makes it easier to catch diseases. Prolonged exposure to a dry atmosphere will also dry out your skin and cause fatigue. 

They Improve Air Quality

When we have our windows and doors closed o most of the day the air inside our homes can become full of dust and other debris. The lighting, paint and amount of electronics in your home will also affect the quality of the air in your home by releasing negative ions into the air. A water feature produces positive ions that cancel these out and also pull any dirt or debris out of your environment. 

Why it’s important: clean air is a natural mood booster, it reduces anxiety, depression and stress. Combine a water feature with some sir-purifying houseplants and you are well on your way to creating a space that promotes good health and wellbeing.

They Block Out Distracting Sounds 

The sound of running water has a white noise effect in enclosed spaces. If you live in a noisy area or struggle to relax then adding a water feature to your home could be a good solution. 

Why it’s important:  loud or distracting noises can lower your concentration when you’re working from home or trying to focus on a task 

An indoor water feature is more than just a pretty feature, it has material benefits to your health and well-being. Find the perfect one now.

Flowers, Gardening, How To, Plants

The-best-hanging-basket-plants

Able to be filled with a mix of plants throughout the year, hanging baskets are a wonderful tool for ornamenting the outside of your home. Unlike plants growing in the beds of a garden, they are less likely to suffer from harsh weather, soil problems, or worrisome pests. However, with so many varieties available, you may feel unsure on which plants to buy. Why not read on for a helpful guide on choosing the best hanging basket plants? 

How many plants per hanging basket?

We believe that five plants per 30cm basket is best, as it allows plenty of space for each plant to grow (which is necessary for a bountiful arrangement). You can add more plants if you wish, but for summer baskets especially, it is good to cultivate your plants early on. As such, more space is always better. Popular summertime plants such as Fuchsias and Geraniums can also be quite vigorous, so will take up greater space. 

How long do hanging baskets last?

Hanging baskets are typically made to last for a single season. However, particular varieties, such as Pansies belonging to the ‘Cool Wave’ series, will flower ceaselessly from autumn to summer. Nonetheless, you may want to switch up your baskets to achieve looks that are unique to each season. This guide will therefore suggest the best hanging basket plants for both summer and winter. 

The Best Hanging Basket Plants for Summer

The-best-hanging-basket-plants

Petunia Surfinia

Sporting pretty, often dual-toned blooms, Petunia Surfinias are a favourite for adorning driveways and patio spaces with a graceful display. Despite their unfortunate introduction to botany in the 1500s (where they were considered demonic!), Petunias have become one of the most popular bedding plants around. 

Unlike regular Petunias, Petunia Surfinias don’t need to be deadheaded, so are perfect for the less attentive gardener. Thirsty plants, they should be watered when the top two inches of soil becomes dry to the touch. In very warm weather, don’t be afraid to water them twice a day.

The-best-hanging-basket-plants

Begonia x tuberhybrida

Highly floriferous, Tuberous Begonias are treasured by gardeners for their rose-like blooms. Their generous flowering period (spanning from June to October) also makes them invaluable for sustaining floral interest when gardens quieten down for the colder months. 

Flourishing in cooler conditions, and tolerant of a little more shade, Tuberous Begonias are well suited for the English climate. One of our favourite varieties is Solenia ‘Orange’, as it has sturdy branches that withstand strong winds, which will neither be weighed down by their abundant flowers. Aside from having orange flowers that are fitting for autumn, this variety is also resistant to mildew.

The-best-hanging-basket-plants

Fuchsia

Discovered by Charles Plumier in the late 1600s, Fuchsias will always make striking additions to pots and flower beds. When planted in a hanging basket, their trailing bell-shaped flowers create bold vertical interest, but for the most prolific display, why not combine them with Petunias or Pelargoniums?

Flowering repeatedly until autumn, Fuchsia ‘Annabel’ will add a distinct touch to your garden with its blush-white flowers. 

The Best Hanging Basket Plants for Winter

The-Best-Hanging-Basket-Plants

Primula ‘Woodland Rose’

With heart-shaped petals gathered around a vibrant yellow centre, Primula ‘Woodland Rose’ is reminiscent of the classic Primrose. Flowering in January and February, it is a great plant for incorporating some romantic colour into your winter garden. It pairs particularly well with white Viola varieties, and harmonises beautifully with the unique foliage of Cineraria ‘Silver Dust’. To keep your Primrose flourishing, remove any spent flowers and dead leaves that appear.

The-best-hanging-basket-plants

Pansies

Admired by gardeners for their intricately marked blooms that resemble a face, Pansies are a great way to add charm to your garden. With a low growing habit, Pansies also make manageable hanging basket plants. Nevertheless, their flowering period (lasting as long as eight months) is arguably their most noteworthy quality. Why not embrace some fiery tones with Pansy ‘Fire’? Or alternatively create a cooler theme with Pansy ‘Marina’?

The-best-hanging-basket-plants

Cyclamen

With unique, butterfly-like blooms, that stand atop their silver variegated leaves, Cyclamen are a classic winter plant. Their upright habit proves a welcome change from the trailing blooms of Geraniums, Fuchsias, and Petunias. As such, they are ideal for neater schemes. Why not plant Cyclamen with Ivy to enjoy a basket filled with handsome foliage?

When watering Cyclamen, you should take care to not water them from the top, as this can risk rotting. Instead, try to water at the base of the plant, which helps the water travel directly to their roots.

Hanging Basket Plants: Common Questions

The-best-hanging-basket-plants

How often should you water hanging baskets?

When the soil of your basket becomes dry to the touch, your plants are ready to be watered. Come summer when the weather warms up, you can comfortably water your hanging baskets once a day.

Can you plant bulbs in a hanging basket?

Dwarf bulb varieties (such as dwarf Narcissus) will complement your hanging baskets towards the end of the season. You could start off a winter basket with Cyclamen and Pansies, and plant your dwarf Narcissus bulbs underneath. As winter concludes, the Narcissus can take centre stage to mark the beginning of spring.

How do you stop hanging baskets from drying out?

To help your basket retain moisture, it should be no smaller than 30cm, and be lined with coco liner. Coco liners are excellent at retaining water, and are also environmentally friendly.

Can you use bin liners to line hanging baskets?

Yes, bin liners are suitable for a hanging basket. They aren’t as sightly as a coco liner, but if you poke some holes in, they will do the job.

 

 

Celebrations And Holidays, Christmas, Flowers, Gardening Year, Grow Your Own, Plants

This year we’ve created a collection of Christmas gifts that will fuel a passion for gardening year-round. With over 140 fabulous gifts just a click away this year is all about treating the gardener in your life.  So, if they’re new to the game or an old hat you will find they’ll love. 

 Stocking fillers for everyone

Who doesn’t love a little something in their stocking? These small gifts are perfect little treats to open on Christmas Day.

Winter Warmers 

Keep your feet and hands warm for winter walks or gardening outdoors.

Battery operated heated gloves

£14.99 

Battery heated Socks

£29.00

Battery Heated Insoles

£9.99

Grow Your Own Seed Kits

 Ignite a passion for gardening this year with Plant Theory. Our eco-friendly and easy to grow seed kits are the ideal introduction to growing your own. 

Grow Your own Purple Veg Seed Kit 

£14.99

Grow Your Own Zesty Herb Seed Kit

£19.99

Grow Your Own Chilli Seed Kit

£14.99

 

Thoughtful Gifts For Friends and Family

Know someone who deserves a treat this Christmas? Why not gift them one of our wonderful hampers or Christmas baskets. 

Indulgent Hampers 

 Start as you mean to go on with silky chocolate treats, sweet chutneys and well-bodied wines – the best that Christmas has to offer. 

The Big Christmas Gift Hamper

£99.99

 

The Family Christmas Hamper

£49.99

 Red Wine and Treats Gift Hamper

£57.99

Hampers For Every Diet 

Packed with the tastiest gluten and sugar-free treats, these hampers cater for everyone. 

Gluten-Free Goodies Gift Hamper

£44.99

Diabetic Snacks Gift Hamper

£28.99 

Alcohol-Free Nibbles Gift Hamper

£29.99

Floral Gifts

Show someone you care with the gift of flowers this year.

Gaultheria Christmas Robin

£22.99

Large Christmas Flower Basket

£29.99

Gaultheria Christmas Reindeer

£22.99

Gifts for the garden

Know someone who can’t stay out of the garden? These are the ideal gifts for them.

‘Geisha Purple’ Evergreen Azalea

£17.99

Colour Changing Solar Light

£8.99

Pink Wellie Planter

£29.99

4 Seasons Mini Lemon Tree

£39.99

Shop all  gifts

Presents for new gardeners

Give your green-fingered friends a great start to their spring and a gift they will love year-round. 

Copper Plated Watering Can

£29.99

Copper Trowel

£33.99

Copper Dibber

£35.99

Decorative Dog Sprinkler

£13.99

Medium Gardening Glove

£13.99

6 Pocket Wall Planter

£11.9

Shop all garden tools 

Gifts for wildlife lovers

february garden birds

A wildlife-friendly garden can attract all sorts of animals from squirrels, rabbits and hedgehogs. Encourage these furry friends into the garden with houses and feeders so you can enjoy watching their antics year-round.

Birds 

Our fantastic bird care gifts bring life into your garden and help our feathered friends raise healthy chicks and thrive throughout the year. 

Small Bird Gift Box

£27.99

Natural Log Nesting Box

£25.99

Cottage Bird House

£29.99

 

Copper Peanut Feeder

£24.99

Cottage Bird House

£29.99

Copper Seed Feeder

£24.99

Shop all bird care

Hedgehogs

Give Hedgehogs a space to hibernate and shelter from harsh weather with a hog house.

Hedgehog House Care Pack 

£37.99

Wooden Hogitat

£63.99

Shop all hedgehog homes

Bees

These little pollinators are great for keeping your garden in good health, but their numbers have been in decline in recent years. Our nesting houses and conservation kits help to keep your garden lively by helping bees thrive. 

Bumblebee Nester

£44.99

Bee Care Gift Set

£49.99

Bee Nesting House 

£18.99

View all bee care

 Gifts for houseplant lovers

 

Houseplants bring life and colour to a home. They lift the mood, purify the air and create a calm atmosphere. Know someone who adores houseplants or who could do with a few more? Then our houseplant collection is a good place to start. 

For the lounge or dining room

These plants love light, need little care, and pack a visual punch.

Dieffenbachia ‘Reflector’

£14.99

Fatsia Japonica 

£29.99

Philodendron Scandens

£13.99

Satin Pothos 

£14.99

Calathea ‘Ornata’

£29.99

Bonsai Tea Tree in Buddha Pot

£20.00

Kitchen & bathroom

These tropical plants love humidity and bring bold colour and fascinating shapes into your kitchen or bathroom. 

Tropical Pitcher Plant

£29.99

Croton Colour Collection 

£14.99

Fern Starter Collection

£14.99

Ficus lyrata

£79.99

Croton ‘Pictum’

£5.99

Brake Fern

£5.99

For more great gift ideas visit our complete gift collection.

 

Flowers, Gardening, Grow Your Own, How To, Plants

A-guide-to-jasmine-plant-care

Noted for their sweetly scented blooms and exquisite foliage, Jasmine plants have been long adored by gardeners. Flourishing in both sun and part shade, Jasmine varieties can enshroud a trellis with a floral blanket, be pruned into a decorative hedge, and even be grown indoors. Despite such versatility however, Jasmine plants still warrant vigilant care. Whether you are considering getting a Jasmine plant, or already have one, this guide covers everything you need to know on Jasmine plant care. 

How to Plant Jasmine

Before you plant your Jasmine, you should seek a warm, sheltered site that receives full sun or part shade. Different species of Jasmine may prefer one or the other. For example, Winter Jasmine is better suited to a south east or north west aspect, while Summer Jasmine will thrive in a sunny south-facing aspect. 

If you are planting your Jasmine straight in your garden, opt for an area with moist, well-drained soil. If the soil appears too rich, add some grit to the planting hole to boost drainage. It is also important that your Jasmine is planted in fertile soil, so we advise you to supplement with compost or well-rotted manure. Taking no more than a handful, sprinkle some compost or manure in the planting hole. By doing this, your Jasmine’s roots can enjoy a steady supply of nutrients. 

A useful thing to know about Jasmine plant care is that an attentive, watchful approach is always best. Jasmine plants are low maintenance and typically don’t fall victim to pests and disease. However, it is essential that you establish their desired habit of growth early on. 

To train your Jasmine to climb up a wall or fence, angle a cane so that it’s leaning on a trellis. Once your Jasmine has reached a height that matches this structure, it can continue to climb upwards. This is caused by arising chemical changes which result in their stems intertwining with the trellis. 

If you are planting your Jasmine in a pot, a cane can again be used to promote a tall, upward habit. Depending on the look you wish to achieve, a compact, bushier look can be created by regular pruning. 

How to Care for Jasmine

A-guide-to-jasmine-plant-care

Once your Jasmine has been planted, you should apply a high-potash feed once a week in summer. This will encourage healthy foliage and flowers, and additionally mitigate any risks of pests and disease. Nevertheless, be cautious when feeding, as too much can result in overly lush growth (and a higher amount of nitrogen hinders blooming). Your Jasmine plant should also be watered regularly during its growing season, and come autumn, it is beneficial to mulch around the base of your Jasmine. This can be done with well-rotted manure, leaf mould, or compost.

A crucial part of Jasmine plant care is pruning; this promotes healthy growth and maintains a desirable shape. It also deters bothersome pests (particularly infestations that are caused by animals). 

It is best to prune right after your Jasmine has flowered, as this allows maximum time for the vines to establish new growth for the next year of flowering. As young Jasmine plants are shy bloomers, you should avoid pruning too drastically. Try to spare as much of your plant as possible (there’s no harm in letting your young Jasmine plant grow a little freely). We simply advise that you:

  • Remove any stems that appear diseased or dead (if older appearing stems are no longer showing signs of flowering, they can also be removed). 
  • You can also remove heavily tangled stems, and carefully separate lightly tangled stems to maintain manageability. 
  • Remove stems that are growing away from your desired direction, or shorten them to create a compact appearance. 

Jasmine Plant Care: Common Questions

A-guide-to-jasmine-plant-care

Does Jasmine need a trellis?

In order to climb, your Jasmine plant will need a supporting structure. This is most commonly a trellis. Jasmine plants cannot climb a wall, but when trained to a trellis, they can grow up to two metres in a single season! If you do not want your Jasmine to climb, it will happily grow in a pot. Why not have it as a house plant to enjoy the heavenly scent indoors?

Do Jasmine plants lose their leaves in winter?

Jasmine plants can either be deciduous, or semi-evergreen (if they are growing in milder climates). It is probable that your Jasmine plant will lose leaves at some point, and this shouldn’t be a cause for concern. If your Jasmine’s leaves are beginning to dry up and fall off however, you are likely under-watering. 

Can I propagate my Jasmine plant? 

Yes, your Jasmine can propagated from hardwood cuttings taken in wintertime. To do so, collect 15cm cuttings from the stem tips of your Jasmine plant (each one should be cut below a leaf). You can also propagate your Jasmine by planting any seeds it produces. 

When should I plant my Jasmine?

You can begin growing Summer Jasmine in spring or autumn, and Winter Jasmine in autumn or winter. The care for both Summer and Winter Jasmine will be the same (but always factor in their differing flowering periods). 

Should I deadhead my Jasmine plant?

Yes, it is wise to remove any spent blooms from your Jasmine plant. The flowers can be pinched off, but why not use them for herbal tea making or fragrant floral arrangements? 

Is Winter Jasmine a Shrub?

Winter and Summer Jasmine are of a different species. Winter Jasmine (Jasminum nudiflorum) is classified as a winter flowering shrub, while Summer or Common Jasmine (Jasminum officinale) is recognised as a vine, and flowers from summer through to autumn.