Awnings, George, How To

How To Clean Awnings Fabric

Maintaining your awning will not only keep it looking bright and at its best all year round, it will also prolong its lifespan. The great thing is that awnings are generally quite easy to look after, so follow our tips on how to clean awnings fabric and frames and you won’t go wrong!

How to clean awnings fabric

Step one – Use a long handled broom to brush off any debris from the top of the awning – dead leaves, twigs, moss and any other debris. This will make it easier to wash later.

Step two – Fill a spray bottle with some warm soapy water and spray over the top of the awning fabric. Scrub with a soft bristle brush to clean off any marks or dirt. Be careful not to scratch the fabric, particularly if it has a waterproofed coating.

Step three – Rinse off the awning with a hose until all the dirt and soap has gone.

Step four – Leave the awning extended, to allow the material to dry out naturally in the air.

Step five – Use a feather duster to sweep out the underside of the awning, getting rid of any dust and cobwebs.

Washing Awning

Top tips

  1. You only need to clean your awning about once every six months. This should be enough to keep it looking fresh each season.
  2. After washing the fabric it’s worth treating it with reproofing spray to ensure the material remains waterproof and stain resistant.
  3. Here at Primrose Awnings we sell bottles of cleaning and reproofing spray for awnings.
  4. Don’t put the awning canopy or valance in the washing machine as this may remove the waterproofing.
  5. To clean the awning frame use a wet cloth and mild detergent to wipe it down. Never use a scouring pad as this can scratch the casing.

Hopefully this guide will set you up for sparkling clean awnings this year. Let us know if you have any advice for maintaining that brand-new look!

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

Awnings, Gardening Year, George, How To

Can Awnings Stay Outside All Year

Once an awning has been installed, most homeowners are keen to leave it up all year round. The main thing that could cause an issue if the awning is left outside all the time is weather and the damage this can potentially cause. So can awnings stay outside all year? The simple answer is usually yes, depending on how the awning retracts and the extremity of your local weather.

Which types of awning can be left outside?

When an awning is left retracted outdoors, it will still be subjected to wind and rain. Standard and half cassette models leave the canopy material partially open to the elements, so their durability will depend on the fabric being waterproof. For extra protection, the casing can be covered with a storage bag to ensure no rain gets in. Full cassette awnings are fully sealed when wound back, so these are perfectly prepared for being left outside all year.

Awnings should never be left open in extreme weather like heavy rain or strong winds as the arms may snap or the fabric rip. If you leave your awning open unattended, you can use an automatic sensor to retract the awning when it detects excessive rain or wind. Note that these will only work for electric awnings, so with manual ones you will need to keep an eye on them.

Can awnings be used in the rain?

The great thing about awnings is the way they transform your patio into a much more usable space when the sun becomes too strong, but with the changeable UK weather it’s nice to be able to stay under them for the occasional shower. Awnings can be left open in light rain as long as the fabric is waterproof. Primrose Awnings are made from 300 gsm acrylic or polyester material which is waterproof tested, so is fine in a spot of rain.

If you are going to leave your awning open in the drizzle you should be aware of the pitch. In order for the water to run off, the awning must be sloped at a minimum of 14 degrees. Otherwise rainwater can pool in the centre of the canopy and the weight of it risks tearing the fabric.

If you wind in an awning during the rain, remember to unwind it fully during the next sunny day to let the material dry off completely. Most awning fabrics are treated to prevent rot, so should be fine stored damp for a little while.

Another consideration is the wind, which often accompanies a downpour. Wind can be even more harmful to the awning structure and fixings so make sure not to leave it open if it is too windy. The general rule is if it’s too breezy to sit outside then the awning should be retracted.

If you need any further advice about choosing your awning, where to install it or how to look after it, please get in touch!

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

Awnings, George, How To

Do Awnings Need Planning Permission

The need for planning permission is a concern for many considering an awning for their home or business property. We’ve shared some simple advice below to help you work out whether your project will require permission. It’s worth sharing your plans with your local authority if you are in doubt, and be aware that it generally takes between 4 and 5 weeks to get approval.

Do awnings need planning permission?

For residential buildings, generally awnings do not require planning permission. Commercial properties like shops usually need full planning permission as they may extend into public areas or cause health and safety issues. Branded awnings must also pass advertising regulations.

Residential awnings

One of the general rules for planning regulations is that if you aren’t creating a usable space then you don’t need permission. The exception would be if the awning extends over or encroaches on your neighbour’s boundary. When planning where your awnings will go, it’s also worth bearing in mind any rain that might potentially run off into your neighbour’s property. It’s always best to spot issues like these in advance!

If your property is a listed building, however, or you live in a conservation area, then you may require approval. Speak to your local authority about your plans before beginning any installation.

Commercial awnings

In most cases a business will require full planning permission to install an awning on their property. Clearly this is necessary for high street buildings like shops or cafés where the awning would extend over the pavement and pedestrians. There are also various regulations to do with health and safety when members of the public use the property. The key is to always check with the planning department of your local authority as policies do vary.

If you are replacing an awning on your commercial property, then you do not generally require new planning permission as long as the replacement is like-for-like. Otherwise, you will need to get full permission once more.

Most businesses, especially shops, will want to feature branding and logos on their awnings. Since the canopy will be on public view, this usually falls under advertising regulations and will also require approval from the relevant authority.

Primrose Awnings offers a wide range of patio awnings that are easy to fit in residential homes, as well as bespoke commercial awnings. Please contact customer service if you need any advice about choosing your awning.

George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

Awnings, Cat, TV

Primrose Awning on Love your Garden

Enid and Robbie’s story on ITV’s Love your Garden last night was special. Having been close friends since 1945, they now live together and care for each other. Robbie’s deteriorating eyesight meant that she was unable to even go in their garden and, over time, the weeds took hold. As she’s also suffering from a type of skin cancer, it’s important that any design will have to include a lot of shaded space.

“I want to give them a garden that they can really enjoy together.”

Love your Garden planThe garden was carefully planned to minimise maintenance. The team fixed a dangerous slope and created a lawn-free space.

“It’s got that seaside feel to it.”

The idea of a fragrant flowerbed by the patio filled with chocolate, strawberry, and aniseed scented flowers was inspiring and definitely worth keeping in mind when planning to change a section in the garden. It’s not always just the looks that matter!

Primrose Awning on Love your Garden 2We were honoured to have been chosen to provide one of our half cassette awnings to help shade Robbie from the sun whilst still being able to enjoy her garden from the comfortable furniture set.

As it is electrically operated, it means that Enid can very easily open and close it. Plus the fabric blocks over 98% of harmful UV rays which is ideal for people with sensitive skin or skin conditions.

Sit down and relax!

You can see the full episode here.

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.