Alice, Celebrations And Holidays, Christmas, Decoration

Decorating your house for Christmas is a great way of getting into that festive feeling. Wreaths, garlands, and swags have long been part of our traditions for adding a natural touch of magic to your home. However, when shopping, many people get confused between the three items and aren’t sure what exactly they are. So Primrose has created a handy guide on the differences between wreaths, garlands, and swags.

difference between a wreath a garden and a swag

Wreaths

wreath

A wreath is an arrangement of leaves, flowers, or other foliage and accessories fastened in a ring. They are used for decoration and sometimes laying on a grave. Christmas wreaths are typically made with pine branches that replica those of a Christmas tree, along with pine cones, berries, birds, or ribbons.

Wreaths can trace their origins back to Ancient Rome, where Romans used to hang a wreath on their doors to symbolise victory after a win in battle. Some people believe that the circular shape of the wreath represents eternity and the circle of life. For Christians, the Christmas wreath can represent Jesus’s suffering. The wreath represents the thorns he wore on the cross, while the tiny berries represent blood and the evergreen branches represent eternal life. 

At Primrose, we sell wreaths in a variety of styles, including this Artificial Pine Christmas Wreath enhanced with sparkly frosting and model turtle doves, to this Classic Red Bow Real Christmas Wreath with pine cones and glossy red berries.

You can shop our full selection of Christmas wreaths here

Garlands

difference between a wreath and a garland

A garland is an arrangement of flowers, leaves, and other accessories. It can be hung as a decoration, or worn around the head. Christmas garlands are usually made with Christmas tree-style pine branches and can contain other items such as berries, pine cones, and model birds. The most common place to find them is hung over the fireplace, but they can also be hung from the ceiling close to the wall, or outside. 

Originally, garlands also had Christian symbolism; they were circular in shape and used to represent the infinite love of Jesus. At Primrose, we sell a range of Christmas garlands, from this natural-looking Wintry Pine Garland with Trimmings and Snowflakes to this contemporary Sleigh and Ski Christmas Garland.

What is the difference between a wreath and a garland?

The difference between a wreath and a garland is the shape. A garland is a long string that is usually draped along a wall or over an object. It can be hung in a circular shape, but it is flexible and free-flowing. A wreath is rigid and fixed into a ring position and is usually hung from a door.

You can shop our full selection of Christmas garlands here

Swags

swag

A swag is similar to a garland. But while a garland is of a similar width throughout, a swag has a tapered end or ends, with a thicker area at the top or in the middle.

Swags can vary in shape. Some, like our Frosted Christmas Swag, are garlands that are weighted in the middle and taper towards the ends. These are great for draping over a fireplace, mantelpiece, or mirror to add an instant traditional Christmas feel. There are also shorter teardrop swags that are hung vertically, and are wider at the top and taper down to the end. 

You can shop our full selection of Christmas swags here

How are you decorating your home this Christmas? Let us know on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

Christmas

Every year, people up and down the country rock out their Christmas jumpers in aid of Christmas Jumper Day. It’s a time for everyone to unite, wear festive knits and take several snaps for social media to show off their silly sweaters.

But more importantly, it’s an opportunity to raise money for Save the Children UK – a great charity which promotes children’s rights,  provides relief and supports children in developing countries.

Primrose have done our bit for Save the Children so let’s see your sweaters!!

  • Email photos@primrose.co.uk
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  • Facebook us @ facebook.com/Primrose.co.uk


Have a great Christmas from everyone at Primrose !

Image result for santa emoji

AmieAmie is a marketing enthusiast, having worked at Primrose since graduating from Reading University in 2014.

She enjoys all things sport. A keen football fan, Amie follows Tottenham Hotspur FC, and regularly plays for her local 5 a side football team.

Amie also writes restaurant reviews on  Barnard’s Burger Blog.

 

 

Christmas, How To, Zoe

how to care for your Christmas Tree

A real Christmas tree can be a beautiful centre piece during the festive season, and is certainly the object of admiration from family and friends who come to visit. But problems can arise when your tree starts to wilt in the heat, drop needles and lose its colour.

Did you know that when natural trees are stressed they begin to shed their needles in an effort to save themselves from dehydration?

In order to keep your tree in tip top condition, and avoid an abundance of needles across your floor, follow our easy steps to keep your tree looking fantastic through to New Year!


Top Tips

  • After you’ve picked your favourite tree you need to cut about half an inch off the bottom of the trunk. Someone may do this for you at the retailer, but if not you can do it yourself easily at home. This will let your tree absorb more water and remain fresher for longer.
  • Within eight hours of cutting the bottom of the tree you need to get it in water, and your tree will be very thirsty! Your tree may need up to 3 litres on the first day, and regular watering every day after this.
  • Do not remove any bark from the tree in an attempt to squeeze it into a container. Most of the water absorption comes from just under the bark, so your tree will dehydrate much quicker if you do this.
  • Some people suggest putting an aspirin in the water to help the tree, or perhaps fizzy drinks such as lemonade that will help your tree absorb some water and help it look extra lovely. BE CAREFUL putting aspirin in your water if you think a curious cat may want to have a sip from it however.
  • Allow your tree to rest for a while before you decorate it, the longer you can leave it the better, preferably twenty four hours.
  • If the foliage on your tree is quite dense, try snipping a few of the branches back to the trunk. This will create a tidier image, but will also save your tree from wasting water on more branches.
  • Place your tree in a cool place. Having your tree next to a fireplace or radiator will dry out your plant.
  • Try to use low voltage fairy lights when you decorate your tree. Larger lights will warm up the branches surrounding it and cause water loss.
  • Keep on top of collecting the fallen pine needles. These can be hazardous for infants or pets if swallowed or stuck in the skin!
  • Lastly, you might find using a Christmas tree spray may help to retain moisture in the branches. You could also try spraying hairspray on the underside of the tree, HOWEVER this will make the tree much more flammable so only do this with great  care.

Christmas Tree Decoration

 

If you follow these steps your tree should remain healthy for up to four weeks and be the envy of all your family and friends!

Haven’t bought your Christmas tree yet? Check out our expert advice on how to spot the perfect Christmas tree.

Zoe at PrimroseZoë works in the Marketing team at Primrose, and is passionate about all things social media.

After travelling across Europe and Asia, Zoë is intrigued by different cultures and learning more about the world around her. If she’s not jet setting, Zoë loves nothing more than curling up with a good book and a large glass of red wine!

She is an amateur gardener but keen to learn more and get stuck in!

See all of Zoë’s posts.

Christmas, Gardening, Grow Your Own, Jorge, Planting, Plants

There have been a number of new trends in Christmas plants, where gardeners have sought to brighten up their gardens and homes with new exotic varieties. Our traditional roster of Christmas plants consists primarily of evergreens that can subsist in Northern Europe’s cold winters. These plants – coloured green, red and white – are often shrubs with berries. Now, plants brought in from further afield include hardy winter-flowering plants suited for Europe’s climate and other ill-suited plants to be grown indoors.

Christmas Cactus

new christmas plants
The Christmas cactus originates from the Brazilian rainforest and is related to Christmas only inasmuch as it flowers from late November to early January. A competitor to the Mexican poinsettia, the plant also blooms in pink, red and white but has a long life span. Grown as a houseplant, it is vulnerable to temperatures below 10°C although it is relatively easy to grow. As a cactus, it is necessary to give the plant a resting period after it flowers through watering only so it does not dry out. Interestingly, as an epiphyte the plant can grow harmlessly on other plants.

Christmas Rose

The Christmas rose is a bit of a misnomer for the plant is a helleborus, rather than part of the rose family, and often flowers from January to March as opposed to December. Brought over from the Alps, this hardy perennial is well suited to the temperate climate of the United Kingdom. The variety associated with the Christmas rose is the ‘Potter’s Wheel’ variety with its white petals and golden stamens. More recent popular varieties include the early flowering ‘Praecox’ variety that can flower for Christmas, and the ‘Snow Frills’ variety that is designed to flower from late autumn to early winter and is characteristic for robust double-flowers.

Hippeastrum

new christmas plant

Recently, the Hippeastrum has gained popularity as a Christmas plant. While the genus comprises of around 90 species, the most popular varieties resemble a six pointed star. Included in this is the ‘Double Delicious’ with its Christmassy bright red petals. Originating from the Caribbean and South America, it is necessary to keep the perennial indoors at Christmas, although can be left outside in the warmer months.

The Hippeastrum is sometimes confused with the Amaryllis. This confusion originates out a dispute between botanists over the taxonomy of two similar genera from different continents. Subsequently, it was decided that the plant in question – the plant from South America – should be labelled a Hippeastrum, while the plant from South Africa an Amaryllis.

Hyacinthus

new xmas plants hyacinth

Hyacinths are the indoor pot plant par excellence as they are leafless, fragrant and highly prolific at producing star-faced bells. As they usually flower in the spring, you will need to buy the special winter flowering varieties. They can be planted in September and October, although they are usually brought in once the temperature drops, and it is recommended that you transfer them to pots once they reach 4 to 5cm high. Particularly popular at Christmas is the ‘Pink Pearl’ variety with its two shades of pink.

Crocus

Crocuses may not be on everyone’s mind at Christmas as they usually come in yellow or purple and flower in autumn or spring, however there are winter-flowering varieties. Varieties sold include the white ‘Snow Bunting’ and others that are often hybrids.

Azaleas

azalea christmas plants

Recently Azaleas have been shaped into Christmas trees to provide a colourful companion to the Christmas tree (although they are probably best left in another room). Varieties chosen are in the colours of Christmas such as the bright red of ‘Andy Wery’ or the appropriately named ‘Koster’s Brilliant Red’.

Jorge at PrimroseJorge works in the Primrose marketing team. He is an avid reader, although struggles to stick to one topic!

His ideal afternoon would involve a long walk, before settling down for scones.

Jorge is a journeyman gardener with experience in growing crops.

See all of Jorge’s posts.