Gardening, Hiring Help in the Garden

So now we are set up to plough through the rest of the plot with the system in place to filter to soil… However, Dex the digger finds yet another layer of buried debris, and we review our tactics.  I looked at hiring a small digger, one small enough to get round to the back garden; but that would set me back £186 for the week, plus £30 each way to deliver and collect.  Even then, we would still need to spend time sifting the soil.

Meanwhile at the local tip where I had just dumped the first rubble load of the day, the sun was shining.  I returned with another load, not an hour later to meet the man at the gate doing the waggy finger thing at me saying “No, no, no, you got to go to the weigh bridge.”  Spluttering and protesting I went there, explained that this was all new to me and I had no money on me. The patient and understandably defensive man showed me the signs that explained this new policy, but let me leave the rubble this time as a sort of trial run.  The eight bags that were light enough for me to lift would have cost me £55. I CANNOT BELIEVE IT!  Was this the end of project revamp?

Hmmmm.

Since I was in any event going down to deepest Sussex the next day I checked with the dump down there. No proof of residency and no charges, hoorah, job done. Now the top soil and turf is ordered, next comes trellis and the decorative planting. Since the chap from the job centre is sooo good, many other jobs are being tackles as well; just a path relayed and a side bed wall rebuilt, but I will stop as we approach the walls of the house itself.

I hired a wacker plate this week for the very reasonable sum of £23 for 24 hours.  It went in the back of my estate car as the handle folded down.  Having leveled the new top soil it needed compressing so that it would remain level and not sink in odd places.  Dex then laid the turf just before the hosepipe ban came in, and we had a timber to walk across so as not to damage the new grass.

Ponds

Tips For Keeping Your Pond Healthy And Clean

Now that the days are becoming longer and warmer and the winter is officially behind us, it’s a great time to make sure that your garden pond is healthy and clean. Here are some tips on how to achieve this:

Hoover up any dirt or debris with a handy pond vacuum – all you have to do is attach it to a hose, stick it under the water (making sure the bag is completely covered by water) and watch your pond become clean again. Pond vacs are an efficient and very easy to use pond tool, (not to mention affordable).

If the pond water is prone to algae and is tinged green, you can turn the water clear again by adding barley straw flakes which create an environment that is harder for algae to grow in and which, incidentally, are non-polluting and are safe for fish, wildlife and even children!

It is important to keep the water moving in the pond to prevent it becoming stagnant. A good pump will do the trick, although a handy way to keep oxygen levels up in the water is to use a pond aerator. Even pond fountains can help since they constantly turn over the water by drawing it up and then releasing it in a cool jet.