Garden Design, Garden Screening, George

Natural fencing ideas

Every garden needs fencing – to mark the boundaries, divide up spaces and provide privacy. But there’s no need to settle for standard wood slatted fences. There are plenty of natural fencing ideas to give your garden borders an edge, fences that stand tall and stand out from the neighbours’.

Let’s kick off with a few alternative fencing ideas.

Willow Hurdles

1. Hurdle fencing

Hurdles are a form of freestanding fence made from handwoven wooden branches, usually willow or hazel. They offer a very rustic look, perfect for a countryside style garden. Willow hurdles are woven from younger, thinner wands, while hazel use thicker branches for a more sturdy feel. Ideal for bordering off any piece of land, they can bring a slice of rural design to even a compact urban garden.

Garden Screening

2. Garden screening

Screening is a great way to refresh your garden look. It’s light and flexible enough to be fixed to existing fences, so you can easily bring a more natural aesthetic to any space. There are many different materials to choose, from rustic bark and willow to modern bamboo and reed. As well as being more interesting and decorative than regular fences, screening can provide additional privacy in overlooked spaces.

Living fence

3. Living fences

If you’re looking to achieve something a little more ambitious, try living fences or ‘fedges’. There are many different forms (aside from the standard hedge!) but one of the most common is woven willow. Plant a row of willow where you’d like your fence and then weave the branches together as they grow. This requires a bit more skill and patience than the other ideas but pays off with a truly unique border.

The benefits of natural fences

Aside from the organic visual appeal that will set your garden apart, there are a number of other benefits from natural forms of fencing. Many kinds are very sustainable. The wood for willow and hazel hurdles is coppiced, meaning branches are cut from new growths on the plant so they’ll regrow by the next year. Because of the natural air gaps in hurdle fencing, it also serves as a better windbreak than standard fences. Wind is dispersed through the gaps, alleviating the risk of the fence toppling over in blustery weather.

Natural fencing maintenance

Generally natural fences will age more than regular ones over time. If you like, you can treat the wood with fence preservative to maintain the initial colouring, or let it fade naturally. Provided they are well secured and not exposed to too much harsh weather, hurdles can last up to 10 years.

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George at PrimroseGeorge works in the Primrose marketing team. As a lover of all things filmic, he also gets involved with our TV ads and web videos.

George’s idea of the perfect time in the garden is a long afternoon sitting in the shade with a good book. A cool breeze, peace and quiet… But of course, he’s usually disturbed by his energetic wire fox terrier, Poppy!

He writes about his misadventures in repotting plants and new discoveries about cat repellers.

See all of George’s posts.

Cat, Garden Screening

Hurdles from Primrose

Perhaps the recent 140 mph wind and heavy rainfall have left your garden looking a bit worse for wear. Or maybe you’re thinking of revitalising your garden ready for the 2014 Summer.

Here are five amazing reasons to consider our hurdles and screening:

  • Huge range of over 22 hurdles and over 40 different screening rolls
  • Discounts for quantity orders
  • Hurdles delivery is just £4.95, no matter how much you order
  • Screening has free delivery, no matter how many you order
  • We’ve got all the accessories, including galvanised wire to fix to walls and fences

“I am so pleased with these hurdles. They are better than any I had seen elsewhere and are sturdy enough to act as a ‘real’ fence – not just cosmetic. Very good value, beautiful product”

Take a look at our huge range of screening:

Brushwood Screening from £12.95Willow Screening from £18.95Bark Screening from £18.95
Artificial Bamboo Screening from £15.95Fern Screening from £22.95Reed Screening from £11.45
Bamboo Cane Screening from £21.45Thick Bamboo Screening from £49.95Bamboo Split Screening from £14.95

“This is the second lot of hurdles purchased from Primrose. Would highly recommend them. They look great if you want something a bit different from normal fencing!!”

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

Cat, Garden Screening

Papillon Screening at Primrose

When we think of gardening we think of the essentials. Garden screening doesn’t usually fall into that category, but it should – its impact on your garden can be phenomenal.

free_delivery_next_dayHiding that fence you’ve still not painted? Easy! Creating privacy on your balcony? Job done! Always wanted a Japanese style garden? How about some bamboo screening for an oriental style?

The Reed Screening was of an excellent quality and a very good price, including free delivery. You could not ask for any better.

Brushwood screening from PrimroseAll of our screening comes with a free next-day delivery and we offer huge quantity discounts. After all, you never just need one roll of screening, do you?

This excellent screening really brightens up the garden and has covered an unsightly brick wall perfectly. Garden has been transformed.

Take a look at our whole screening and fencing range:

wedding-meCat works in the marketing team and is responsible for online marketing, social media and the newsletter.

She spends most of her time reading about a variety of interesting facts, such as oddly named Canadian towns, obscure holidays and unusual gardening.

She mostly writes about Primrose news and current events.

See all of Cat’s posts.

Decoration, Guest Posts, Lou C

Nosy Neighbours

Now maybe it’s just me, but I do like a certain amount of privacy in the garden. Having established that we are somewhat of a novelty in the locality (after all, we love to garden), we know that many of our antics create a certain amount of curtain twitching and more than a few passing comments — not least the regular return trips from the garden centre with the car packed to the rafters with yet more plants.

There have also been certain garden mishaps I’d rather forget, like the time I tumbled down our (then grassy) slope after losing my balance whilst trying to insert a solar light spike in our rock-hard clay soil or when I suffered from pins and needles in both feet after too much crouching down as I weeded. Let’s just say that John Cleese and his Ministry of Silly Walks had nothing on me for nearly five minutes.
The newly painted fence in the garden
As part of a new build development, we are overlooked on all sides, and all sides are not more than a good stone’s throw from us (not that I’ve ever checked in practice of course!). It doesn’t help that our garden is on an incline and our patio (well, that’s what we like to call it, although I think that I might find a photo of it under the dictionary definition of a handkerchief) sits at the top, for all to see.

Maybe I’m just kidding myself – after all, are neighbours really that nosy and am I really that interesting (silly walks and roly polys aside of course)? I’m sure neither is the case but this does nothing to dampen my desire for a little more privacy, particularly when my next door neighbour (unassuming, friendly and not allergic to a few plants herself) combats her slope by having her garden landscaped into levels. This means that when she stands on her patio, she is now waist height with the top of our fence, in manner of the Jolly Green Giant and it now feels like Lilliput on this side of the fence.  In fairness, she does try and announce her presence with a well placed “ahem” or “knock, knock”, should she want our attention, which is usually quite rare. However, it can be a little disconcerting to know that the view from her conservatory window and garden leads straight over the fence into our patio and garden room!
Pergola with hanging baskets in the garden
Building a pergola attached to the house has helped a little and has created a little more privacy overhead, but this still doesn’t solve the whole problem. After a lot of negotiating (read: begging), my husband agreed to a trellis screen carefully placed at the top of the rockery which solved the problem of the neighbours to the back of us having a direct view of the patio. However, this still leaves the issue of my next door neighbour’s view.
A garden trellis
Not one to be deterred, I have taken the opportunity to purchase several more well placed clematis and once they are settled (and not slug food) they may hopefully blur the boundaries a little. However, they will not reach the dizzy heights needed to screen my neighbour’s view without something to attach themselves to and it seems a little extreme to use even more trellis screening, even if it is attached to the fence. We have for now decided that we are on good enough terms with our neighbour to leave things as they are.
Neighbour's red setter dog
Unfortunately the red-headed lodger who has recently moved in has none of the tact and diplomacy of her landlady. In fact, she loves nothing better than spending the greater part of a day peering over the fence into our garden and she’s not discreet about it! Even catching her on camera didn’t seem to deter her enthusiasm although it soon became clear that she was particularly enamoured with our furry five.
Red setter dog looking over fence
It does at first feel quite disconcerting, knowing we are being watched but it is quite a novelty knowing that it is by a rather large red setter and it certainly adds to the Lilliputian effect! I just hope the fence holds because I’ve seen the devastation she has wreaked on her side of the fence and there’s a lot more to play with here.

The whole business has left me wondering though, how do other people deal with privacy in an overlooked garden, and how much does it matter?

Lou C